How To Motivate Your Best Recruiting Tools

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Have you ever done a simple search on Twitter using the terms “‘my company’ hiring”? If not, take a look at just how many people have tweeted from their personal account about their company’s open positions.

The social nature of today’s employees are making employee referrals more important, and relevant, than ever. And there’s no doubt that employees should be among your top sources for recruiting.

A study by CareerXRoads examined 185,000 hires in 2012 and found that, for every approximately 100,000 external hires, nearly 25,000 of the openings were filled through an employee referral program. Additionally, SilkRoad found employee referrals to be the top source of interviews (57 percent) and hires (61 percent).

Employee referrals and specialized job posting tools have made recruiting strategies much more effective and efficient. Here are some ways to make sure you’re utilizing and motivating one of your best recruiting tools:

Give your employees access to social media at the office. According to a study by global law firm Proskauer, 36 percent of employers actively block access to social media sites. With 90 percent of companies now using social media for business purposes, this seems completely counterintuitive. Allow access to social media sites during work hours — work will still get done and you’ll have happy, referral-driven employees.

Keep employees aware of job openings and provide short, concise wording for them to share the job posting on their social channels or via email. It is also a good idea to provide something simple like a whiteboard in a visible area where job openings can be posted for employees to see.

Develop employee referral programs that provide something other than cash incentives. Consider building a “refer for the team” culture, recognize employees for bringing on strong team members, or offer non-cash rewards like mini vacations. Or, you can let them choose from a list of different options to make it a little more personal.

Develop employee referral programs that provide cash incentives. Providing bonuses in the form of cash, gift cards or prepaid debit cards can be a big motivator for some employees to bring in highly qualified candidates for open positions. If this suits your culture better than non-cash incentives, give it a try.

Take a data-based approach to determine what motivates your employees to refer good candidates.Rather than guessing what the most effective way is, survey a sample of employees who make referrals and those who don’t to understand motivators and barriers to participation. Benchmarking your efforts against other firms is also a great way to pick up other tips.

Make the referral purposeful by giving perspective of what it means to bring in someone you know. Working with a friend can make life more enjoyable for your employees because they are bringing in people they choose to spend time with outside of work. These two worlds coming together are exciting and refreshing.

By keeping your best recruiting tools motivated to continue bringing in great candidates, and using the best tools to source for additional qualified candidates, you’ll be well on your way to a more effective and efficient recruiting strategy.

About the Author: Heather R. Huhman is a career expert, experienced hiring manager, and founder & president of Come Recommended, a content marketing and digital PR consultancy for job search and human resources technologies. She is also the instructor of Find Me A Job: How To Score A Job Before Your Friends, author of Lies, Damned Lies & Internships (2011) and#ENTRYLEVELtweet: Taking Your Career from Classroom to Cubicle (2010), and writes career and recruiting advice for numerous outlets.

 

Employee Retention: Is Offering More Time Off the Answer?

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Losing an employee can have negative impacts on an organization, even if the separation was initiated by the employer. Despite terminating an employee for poor performance or something else unsavory, the cost of replacing them can add up. From recruiting costs, time and lack of productivity due to being short-staffed, employers need to consider all that goes into this. But what about voluntary turnover? How can this unexpected disruption in the company’s workforce make a difference?

Regardless of the situation, human resources professionals understand the importance of employee retention and are consistently considering ways to make their offerings, benefits and perks better to stay competitive and attractive to their employees and future hires. Offering things like free lunch, tuition reimbursement, bonuses/incentives, training and development or flexible work schedule have all been things companies incorporated into their offerings, but what happens if that’s not enough?

All of these things can cater to different employees’ needs, but truth be told, employers can’t always offer everything that matters to employees. As we discuss the importance of work/life balance, employees are consistently encouraged to take their vacation time but with a capped amount of paid time off, many employees have actually taken less time off despite having it. This could be due to various reasons, ranging from: stress from getting behind in work and/or coming back to a large workload; determining what’s worth taking time off for; or worries something important will come up after all paid time off (PTO) has been used. I know I’ve even been guilty of saving vacation time only to reach the end of the year and realize I have a ton of days left that will be lost. So what can employers do? Remove the limit.

In my career, I’ve come across many companies that have removed the limitations of PTO. Some of the most interesting concepts I’ve come across are as follows:

  • Breaks for learning: A little over a year ago, I came across a few technology companies that offered their employees several weeks off a year for learning. I thought this was brilliant and felt the employer most likely would progress because employees are bringing back outside learning and applying to their work. Employees are given the freedom to learn about the things that truly inspire and interest them without the stress of having to take time off to do it. And the employer benefits because these new insights can help the organization progress in a way they wouldn’t have otherwise.
  • Sabbaticals: A company I interviewed with about 3 years ago offered month long sabbaticals for every three years of employment. Throughout my career, I’ve had many coworkers quit their jobs to take time off to travel, find their calling or soul search. Perhaps this is more common in younger generations before they have the responsibility of taking care of children, pets and mortgages, but with the influx of generation Y coming into the workforce, it’s something employers need to be prepared for more and more. Rather than lose employees due to their wanderlust or desire to get involved in personal projects, employers offer these sabbaticals to allow them to do the things they want to do without losing their key employees. Pair this with good workforce planning, and employers would be likely to incur less costs than if an employee quit.
  • Unlimited vacation time: Another company I’ve interviewed with also offered unlimited vacation time. I asked them how this affected productivity if employees took time off constantly but learned that it didn’t make much of a difference as if they were capped. The reason was because this structure led to accountability and reward. Employees are able to take unlimited time off if they finished projects and completed work on time. This offered them a little more flexibility in their schedules to get their work done and the reward for finishing projects early or on time was something that kept the team motivated.

Are these options feasible for every employer? Of course not. But in the pursuit to find retention initiatives, this should be considered. Employees can’t get everything they want out of life from their employer and may occasionally come to a crossroad between work and personal desires. Employers offering better PTO benefits might help mediate a person’s individual work/life balance needs.

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Simple Steps to Boost Your Employer Brand

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As employment branding continues to be a trend in talent acquisition, more organizations are starting to see the positive effects of this, while others are sensing competitive pressures by not having one. As more job seekers become advised about performing their due diligence and researching a company before applying or interviewing, companies need to take stock of what a seeker would see if they did a basic search of the organization. Will the company have a robust presence on social media and enticing career pages, or will their social media pages seem abandoned and will the career page fall flat?

Of course, there are plenty of companies who have an amazing brand, but some of them also have a person or team of people dedicated to managing it. But, what about the companies that don’t have the resources or budget to hire a full time employee or consultant? Do they miss out on the chance of showcasing their culture just because they don’t have the means to do it? The answer is no.

There are plenty of simple things that companies can do to build some traction on their brand, and it doesn’t require a full time person to manage it. It’s simply about optimizing on the things occurring at your organization day in and day out and repurposing it for branding. The person contributing to this effort doesn’t need to be a marketing guru or recruiting genius, but someone who understands the fundamentals of both and who has a little extra time in their work week to keep initiatives consistent.

Below are a few easy things to boost your brand:

  • Social platforms: There’s no denying how useful social media can be when it comes to getting your company’s name out there. Some of the best brands even have dedicated profiles for their jobs or specific job roles. Of course, managing a bunch of profiles can be a huge undertaking. In this case, simply using your established company profiles to include employment branding can be perfect. Ensure you’re regularly scheduling out jobs, events and things showcasing your culture. All it takes is a few minutes a week to schedule out consistent messages through tools like Hootsuite. Just make sure whoever’s managing the profiles also remembers to check and respond to messages in a timely manner.
  • “A Day in the Life” campaigns: When candidates research your company, they’re trying to get the most accurate picture of what it’s like to work there. Including little blogs, short videos or employee Q&A sessions can give them exactly what they’re looking for. Take time to connect with internal recruitment and find out what hot jobs they’re recruiting for and then connect with those currently in the position. Taking time to interview them or get some candid feedback about the aspects of their jobs, why they like it and any interesting facts can help you build that content easily. Keep it authentic—include the good and the mundane aspects. That can allow candidates to get a realistic preview of the job.
  • Employee testimonials: Employee testimonials are considered heavily by candidates, so be sure to consider these in your branding efforts. Creating a Glassdoor campaign to get consistent (and candid) reviews is one suggestion. Also, including employee spotlight features on social media or your career pages can be another simple way to boost the brand. Get a quote or two about why they like working at the company or in the specific job.
  • Sharing events: Your company participates in several events a year and this can be a great way to showcase your culture and happenings. From pot lucks, birthdays, “wins”, conferences, holiday events, social responsibilities and just general good times, this can be opportune for getting visual content. Snap a picture or take short videos. Make sure they’re edited and post away on social media, eblasts or the career sites.
  • Optimizing career pages: I have come across career pages that are so boring, it actually turned me off from the company. Even if they were a reputable company with good opportunities, a bad career page can have adverse effects. This is the time you can hype up a candidate and it’s the homestretch before whether they apply to a job or not. Even if you don’t build out multiple pages to highlight specific things like benefits/perks, corporate social responsibility, and so on, it’s still an opportunity to build out the content on one. What differentiates your company? What can you offer your employees? Why should someone want to work for you? Keep these questions in mind when including key information. Also be sure to include the content you’ve been creating for the branding initiatives, and if possible, feeds to your social sites.

Building a brand doesn’t have to be as involved or as intimidating as some companies might think. It’s just a matter of staying timely, consistent and well-rounded. Dedicating some time to this regularly will build up your content quickly.

For this post, Doostang thanks The Social HR Connection.

About the Author, Ashley Lauren Perez: After graduating with a bachelor’s degree in human resources and organizational management, Ashley pursued her passion and secured a career path in the human resources industry. She is currently a Sourcing Specialist for WilsonHCG, as well as a Brand Ambassador for WilsonHCG and #TChat.  Additionally, she uses her experience and knowledge to write a blog focusing on an array of Social HR topics. Even if you aren’t in the Charleston, SC, area, you can easily connect with Ashley onLinkedIn,Twitter and Facebook

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7 Ways to Encourage Creativity in the Workplace

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Finding ways to foster workplace creativity and innovation isn’t easy. But, if you want your company to thrive, you must empower employees to achieve great things. In doing so, they will likely take on responsibilities and roles that extend beyond their job description. This cycle of creativity and innovation is one you want to foster and maintain in order to see your company prosper.

If you’d like to see more of this in your workplace, here are some effective ways to amp up creativity and innovation in any office environment:

Be the leader they need

No one has a more important role than the leader when it comes to cultivating innovation and creativity. As a leader, if you show that you are invested in your team and their contributions, they will stay motivated.

On the flip side, if your employees continually come to you with new ideas that get pushed aside or forgotten about, they will stop bringing them altogether. Always set aside time to talk through everything and figure out how and if new ideas can be implemented. If they can’t, make sure they know new ideas are still appreciated — even just a simple thank you will do!

To take it one step further, you may also consider offering incentives or rewards. This could be gift cards, bonuses, or public/private recognition to make your team feel like you appreciate their ideas and that it pays off to share them.

Look at the bigger picture

If you’re just beginning to foster a more creative an innovative workplace, you may need to spur some ideas at first. One way to do this may be to identify company goals and outline tasks that employees can do to help the company achieve those goals.

These goals may be tied to increasing productivity and efficiency, profits, or team collaboration. By putting your employees in charge of a clear directive that will directly impact the company’s bottom line, you can empower them to make a difference.

Make sure you’re not just assigning extra responsibilities to your team, though. Clearly explain all of the goals and tasks, and then let your employees willingly raise their hands to take leadership of something. This way they will be able to choose something they are personally passionate about, leading to much better results.

Provide a workspace conducive to creativity

Google has slides, a fireman’s pole and napping rooms. Real estate investment firm Fundrise has an office dog, Zappa. Student hub, Chegg, has a lifesize chess set. Discovery commerce platform Birchbox hosts in-office concerts. The possibilities for making your workplace more conducive to creativity and innovation are endless!

Add bright colors, out-of-the-ordinary office furniture, and fun office activities to help employees  get the creative juices flowing. If a slide or dog isn’t realistic, consider a ping pong table, a mini fridge stocked with beer, or a simple paint job to bring color to the office.

Encourage new ideas from everyone

You may think that all of your employees with good ideas are vying for your attention and making their new ideas known to the entire office. But it is possible that there are a few people with great ideas that feel they have no way to share them.

For your less outspoken employees, offer a suggestion box in which employees can submit their ideas quietly. Also, try to make a point to connect with the more quiet team members by taking them out to lunch or meeting with them so they feel they can share their ideas privately.

Embrace diversity

When someone mentions workplace diversity, we tend to think quotas and politics. However, diversity can have a significant and positive impact on creativity and innovation in your workplace.

If you’ve cultivated an environment in which everyone thinks the same way and tends to agree with the same things, it is going to be very difficult to get a well-rounded pool of ideas. Plus, where’s the fun in that?!

During the hiring process, consider the background and experience you already have on your team and make sure you are focused on bringing in talent with something new and fresh to offer.

Extend beyond expectations

To cultivate an innovative environment in which employees are driven to go beyond their job descriptions, cross-training can be very useful. Cross-training involves teaching an employee who was hired to perform one job function the skills required to perform other job functions.

Remember: There is a fine line between empowering your employees to learn additional job duties, and overwhelming them. When you find a healthy balance that empowers rather than overwhelms, you can formally organize a process to get employees prepared to do more than just one single job. This not only helps the company run more efficiently, but it also keeps them interested and engaged.

Awaken competition

There are a number of ways you can spur healthy competition within the workplace. It generally comes about in two ways: organized or organically.

Organized competition can be something like an idea board. This is where all of the great ideas presented to leadership and gives recognition to each person that came up with the idea. Organic competition, on the other hand, will come about naturally between employees in similar roles.

Keep an eye on your team and see that these friendly competitions don’t get too out of control. It’s natural and fun to have a little competition among co-workers, but if it becomes malicious or is at the expense of others, it will require intervention by leadership.

Amping up creativity and innovation in an office environment can be a challenge, but simply encouraging feedback and competition, providing an inspiring workplace, and embracing your role as a leader can make a world of difference.

Weigh in! What kinds of things have you found to foster creativity in your workplace?

About the Author: Heather R. Huhman is a career expert, experienced hiring manager, and founder & president of Come Recommended, a content marketing and digital PR consultancy for job search and human resources technologies. She is also the instructor of Find Me A Job: How To Score A Job Before Your Friends, author of Lies, Damned Lies & Internships (2011) and #ENTRYLEVELtweet: Taking Your Career from Classroom to Cubicle (2010), and writes career and recruiting advice for numerous outlets.

Why Sourcers are Crucial for Talent Acquisition

Why Sourcers are Crucial for Talent Acquisition

An American judge must decide who is right between Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's estate and a Sherlock Holmes expert

When I first heard of sourcers, I’ll be honest, I had no idea what their purpose was. The job duties seemed similar to a recruiter and I couldn’t discern the need to divide the role into two. It wasn’t until I had the opportunity to work as a sourcer that I learned how essential they are to the talent acquisition process. After being in the industry for years, I was actually surprised more companies hadn’t used these individuals sooner. Sourcers really make an impressive impact.

Below are some top duties I performed as a sourcer. I truly believe these things are what made the recruitment process more successful than any recruitment role I had been involved in the past:

  • Support for recruiters and deep mining of candidates:Recruiters can be bombarded with a lot of tasks that take away from their ability to seek out top candidates. These tasks range from coordinating/communicating with hiring managers, managing ATS, administrative duties and so on. Although these things are essential to keep the process flowing, it prevents them from taking the necessary time to find passive candidates, post jobs in unique places, build relationships with distinct professional organizations and so on. Sourcers aren’t bogged down with all the irrelevant duties and can focus on mining for talent, which increases talent pipelines and creates better opportunities for quality candidates.
  • Market research: Just as stated before, time can be limited for recruiters. Sourcers have the ability to not only mine for talent but also to perform deep research on the talent markets. They can determine the supply vs. demand, competitor intelligence, best places to find talent and more. Having this market research can help companies reposition their strategies to be more attractive and proactive.
  • Employment branding: Of course posting to job boards is important for getting candidate applications, but sometimes recruiters are only able to have enough time to do just that. Sourcers can get creative with the job postings. For example, when I was sourcing for software developers in San Francisco, I took the time to craft postings for jobs, social media, and tech specific groups (i.e. GitHub). I would highlight interesting things about the company, teams, products and what not. It made the opportunity more “three dimensional” and helped it stand out from the typical noise.
  • Initial screening: Time is precious and we can only screen so many candidates. Unfortunately, automatically screening out candidates before speaking to them can cause companies to miss out on hidden gems. Sourcers can provide a better candidate experience by performing initial screening processes, allowing candidates to have a chance to speak to a human and not feel like their resume went into a black hole.

Although the listed tasks above might seem very basic, it really is surprising how much it can help the talent acquisition strategy. As a sourcer in the past, I believed I made a difference in the process by finding quality candidates, unique candidate referral sources, creative ways to promote the brand and jobs. I also felt like the added support to recruiters helped cut down time-to-fill, which is always a huge bonus.

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About the Author, Ashley Lauren Perez: After graduating with a bachelor’s degree in human resources and organizational management, Ashley pursued her passion and secured a career path in the human resources industry. She is currently a Sourcing Specialist for WilsonHCG, as well as a Brand Ambassador for WilsonHCG and #TChat.  Additionally, she uses her experience and knowledge to write a blog focusing on an array of Social HR topics. Even if you aren’t in the Charleston, SC, area, you can easily connect with Ashley onLinkedIn,Twitter and Facebook

Market Research Boosts Recruitment Strategy

Market Research Boosts Recruitment Strategy

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Market research is an essential step in the talent acquisition process and, surprisingly, is a step that may be inadequately implemented or missed all together. During my time in recruiting and sourcing roles, I learned how helpful market research was when starting the initial search for candidates. It’s helpful when identifying current supply and demand, challenges and opportunities. It gave me a solid starting point when pipelining candidates, making my search more efficient and effective. It’s also helped me reposition the position to be competitive.

Here are a few simple things you should review while initially performing market research:

  • Supply and demand reports: pulling these reports can provide some great insight into the talent market. Understanding how many candidates are available in comparison to posted jobs will allow a recruiter to see what they’re up against. Also, understanding average compensation, popular job titles and typical candidate profiles can allow a recruiter to reposition the verbiage if needed to ensure their job postings are more visible.
  • Competitor intelligence: in some cases, the supply and demand reports will also show top job posters in the market. This can make it easy for recruiters to see organizations that are aggressively recruiting for the same types of candidates. In researching these companies, recruiters can develop their outreach and steer conversations with candidates in a way that can highlight positives of the job and company, creating a competitive twist.
  • Pipelining: not all markets and job roles are the same, so it’s important for a recruiter to research the most popular resources to find candidates before investing in these channels. Investigate job boards, social media, career fairs, and so on to see the best places to post your job and source for talent.
  • Partnerships: building relevant partnerships in the talent market can be a great way for you to get your job in front of the right people and allow for opportunities to network with candidates. Research relevant professional organizations, universities/colleges/technical schools, veteran assistance programs, chamber of commerce associations, professional meet ups, and so on to really get a feel for these opportunities.

Although these are four simple suggestions to initially pull market research, it’s surprising how helpful this information can be. It’s allowed my job postings and networking to become more visible, thus allowing for more traffic. It was especially helpful during times I was a virtual recruiter and couldn’t physically do these things. It’s helped me get in front of relevant candidates and identify different ways to position my postings and conversations to ensure my jobs were competitive in the market. Do yourself a favor next time you get a new requisition and perform some of the steps above. I’d love to hear how it impacts your success rate.

About the Author, Ashley Lauren Perez: After graduating with a bachelor’s degree in human resources and organizational management, Ashley pursued her passion and secured a career path in the human resources industry. She is currently a Sourcing Specialist for WilsonHCG, as well as a Brand Ambassador for WilsonHCG and #TChat.  Additionally, she uses her experience and knowledge to write a blog focusing on an array of Social HR topics. Even if you aren’t in the Charleston, SC, area, you can easily connect with Ashley on LinkedIn,Twitter and Facebook

How to Reward and Motivate Employees–Without Spending Money

“I’ve got some great team members who regularly go above and beyond the call of duty, who give me 110%, and are really making a difference for my company. Then I’ve got others who are steady and good, not stellar, but solid. I want to reward the stellar employees and let them know how much I value their contribution without messing up my whole compensation structure. Do you have any ideas for perks or rewards I could use that don’t involve pay?

I have yet to find an effective reward that doesn’t cost money. That seems to be the way we all keep score. People value their own being by their income and if you want to reward or motivate someone, they seem to need to see dollars. For our business, roles don’t help. Time off with pay works, but that still costs something.”
Dan Constance, Owner, Northshore Fireplace

5 Ways to Reward Your Employees:

1. Celebrate Your Success
“Logo t-shirts and coffee mugs are popular, so if we get any for customers, we include staff too. Birthdays are celebrated with cake and cards signed by everyone. We sometimes give out one-of-a-kind certificates for acts of special significance – like the shipping clerk who chased a customer on foot down several blocks with a forgotten package. We recently had a spectacular month, and to celebrate, we ran a week-long lunchtime bag-toss tournament culminating in an outside-catered onsite barbecue lunch. Turned out the tournament was a huge amount of fun, and we will definitely repeat it next year. People always appreciate being able to go home early before major holidays, and since this is not a very productive time, it is of little cost and shows our staff that the company recognizes they have lives outside of work!”
Chrissy Hansen, Marketing Manager, Cozy Products

2. Treat Employees as Co-Workers
“I, personally, really care about our employees and their families. I treat them as co-workers and not employees. I work as hard as they do. For example, during the rush of the end of the month, I will stay at work up to the time the last moving crew comes back. When the employees see you, the boss, waiting for them to come back and they realize that you are as tired as them, they will show up the next day waiting to see you at work as well. And they do. And that makes them feel part of the company. But most of all, my employees know that I will be there for them during good times and hard times. I have been there for weddings, anniversaries, baptisms, wakes, funerals and hospitals.”
Mina Georgalas, Bernard Movers

3. Let Your Team Choose Activities
“I make them come up with ideas! While it’s a small monetary investment, we have a $400 monthly budget for any sort of “fun” activities that’s pretty much first come first serve. It allows us to have all sorts of events (movie nights, ping-pong tournaments, happy hours, etc.).”
Erik Severinghaus, Founder, Simple Relevance


4. Word of Mouth Recognition
“We do a lot of work with helping companies create a culture of innovation and incentivizing employees is a critical part of the process. Ironically, when we query employees, most do not necessarily want to be financially rewarded for their actions. First and foremost, they want recognition by their peers and superiors for a job well done. From a simple mention in a staff meeting to a formal plague or trophy for a job well done – word of mouth recognition is always welcomed. Establishing a formal award system like an “Employee of the Month” program with preferred parking, a Friday afternoon off or other special treatment are also well received. Don’t hesitate to ask your own employees how they’d like to be “compensated” for a good job…customizing the gift to each employee goes a long way to making them feel empowered and supported.”
John Edelmann, Cloverleaf Innovation

5. Hire the Right People
“Motivating our employees effectively without spending too much money is a balance and once again, starts with hiring the right people who embody the values of the company. This enabled us to create an environment where our employees feel that it is their company/business and they care about its progress, growth and reputation.”
Dr. Jason Jared, Chiropractic Physician, ProACTIVE Chiropractic & Physiotherapy

It’s important to reward your top performers, but it doesn’t always have to be about the money.

About the AuthorBrad Farris is the founder of EnMast, a community of business owners committed to being better leaders and growing better businesses. He is also principal advisor of Anchor Advisors, with experience leading businesses & business owners into new levels of growth and success. Through his work with over 100 Chicago area small businesses he has experience in guiding founders and business owners through the pitfalls and joys of growing their business. Prior to joining Anchor Advisors, Brad spent over 10 years managing business units for a family-owned conglomerate with sales of $2 million to $25 million. When not working Brad enjoys cycling, cooking and the NFL. He is married with 5 children and lives in Chicago, Illinois. Connect with him on Google+Twitter

4 Ways to Attract Killer Talent

Finding killer talent to fill open jobs is a problem many companies are facing these days. In fact, 49 percent of employers report difficulties finding qualified candidates for their jobs.

So what are some things you can do to attract the best talent out there? Let’s look at a few simple actions companies are overlooking in the search for the best and brightest:

Pay Attention to Company Culture

It’s no surprise people are attracted to a healthy company culture. They like to wake up each day and go to work with a sense of purpose, an excitement to see coworkers, and to make a contribution to the company mission. In fact, experts suggest a 20-30 percent increase in corporate productivity when compared with competitors who pay less attention to cultivating a healthy culture.

If you are already proud of the culture you’ve spent so much time planning and building, you need to share the fact. Post employee testimonials on your website, plug it as a benefit in your job postings, share company photos on social media, submit guest blogs about the best cultural practices to online news outlets with high readership. Think of creative ways to highlight your culture and increase the visibility of such to new talent.

Offer Creative Compensation

Job seekers aren’t just looking for money anymore. While competitive salary structures are a must if you want to attract the best talent, there are other ways to creatively sweeten the pot.

Take vacation time, for example. While in most companies it’s a ‘given’, not every company offers opportunities beyond the standard two-week allowance. While not breaking the bank you can provide options like a few Volunteer Days Off (VDOs) in which employees can take a day to volunteer for their favorite charitable organization. In this way, you help employees give back to the community, which can significantly improve morale!

Take Part in Career Fairs

Much of the job search process is conducted online these days. While the Internet offers countless opportunities to find excellent talent, the old fashioned career fair should never be overlooked.

According to a recent survey, 44 percent of recent college grads apply to between one and five jobs at a time. Attending job fairs not only helps you get your brand in front of job seekers, but also gives you a better chance of ensuring one of the opportunities they pursue is yours. Job fairs also allow to you to get an in-person sense of these prospective candidates. You can gain valuable information about a person in a brief conversation; a chance usually only afforded by the interview process!

Engage Prospective Talent on Social Media

While you are taking steps to meet prospective talent in person, head to social media platforms to engage talent online. Recent statistics report 73 percent of employers successfully hired candidates who were engaged via social media.

The process to finding the best talent needs to start before you have a position that needs filled. Avoid simply posting your jobs on social media platforms and instead look to engage with prospective candidates. Engagement means interaction. Post relevant information about finding the best jobs, ask for followers’ input and opinions, and respond when someone has something insightful to say. When you increase the amount of communication you have with your followers, they will be more likely to pay attention when you do share available positions.

Finding the best talent for your jobs can be a challenge, so if you are having a difficult time navigating the obstacles associated with finding great prospective employees, consider adopting a few new strategies. By advertising your company’s best qualities in creative ways and engaging with talent more directly, you will be sure to attract killer candidates in no time.

What do you think? What tactics to you employ to find great new talent?

About the Author: Heather R. Huhman is a career expert, experienced hiring manager, and founder & president of Come Recommended, a content marketing and digital PR consultancy for job search and human resources technologies. She is also the instructor of Find Me A Job: How To Score A Job Before Your Friends, author of Lies, Damned Lies & Internships (2011) and #ENTRYLEVELtweet: Taking Your Career from Classroom to Cubicle (2010), and writes career and recruiting advice for numerous outlets.

 

5 Genius Interview Questions

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It is difficult to get to know someone in the average 40 minutes it takes to conduct an interview. Sure, you may have spoken on the phone once or twice, but assessing a candidate’s worth to your company in the time it takes to conduct an interview is no small task.

As a hiring manager, you have to be creative on this front every day. You have to read between the lines of candidates’ answers to your questions to ascertain their potential. Most candidates will come prepared with stock answers to the most common questions, so you need to ask questions to engage them in real conversation. Here are a few suggestions:

1. What is one thing you would change about your last job?

There is much to learn about a candidate in this one simple question. Their answer will shed light on how they view management, how well they work as part of a team, and how much they invest in their company. It will also reveal some creative problem-solving skills. There are ways to improve any workplace, and employees who exhibit the ability to see a problem and come up with a constructive solution are a valuable asset.

This question also reveals potential leaders. Candidates who complain about an aspect of a past job they resented are likely going to do the same thing in your company. Those who come up with creative solutions, on the other hand, are likely to help your company grow. These are future managers and project leaders; people who can potentially make an incredible contribution.

2.  What is one thing you are interested in doing that isn’t in this job description?

The answers to this question will demonstrate how closely a candidate has read the job description and the amount of time they have spent considering how well they will fit. It will reveal skills the candidate may not have included on their resume, and different directions their career could take in your company.

Multi-faceted employees thrive when they are not pigeon-holed into one set of tasks, and the interview is a perfect time to find out how they might be creatively utilized in the workplace.

3. Why do you think you fit within our company culture?

This is a great question to ask if you want to know how a candidate will fit into your company culture, which is as important for you as it is for them. A good company culture is the second highest priority for most job seekers, second only to salary.

A candidate may be surprised when you ask this question, but a valid answer shows they’ve done their research, and further that they are interested in your company for more than just a paycheck. They’re interested in the lifestyle and culture of your workplace.

4. What did you learn from your greatest professional failure?

Most interviewers ask candidates to expound upon their greatest professional accomplishment. It is just as crucial to know how a prospective employee deals with failure. Some may hedge around the question, or give an example of a minor slip-up. This is indicative of a person who is ashamed of of failure and fearful of recounting examples to a prospective employer.

An honest candidate will not be afraid to tell you exactly what went wrong and the valuable lesson they took from it. Everyone makes mistakes, but those who learn from those mistakes experience professional and personal growth at an exponentially faster rate. You want to hire someone who will grow with your company, not someone who will shrink away from possible failures.

5. Are there any members of the current management you are interested in working with?

If you want to know how well the candidate has done their homework on the company, this is the question to ask. The candidates most dedicated to getting your job will know the management team and their backgrounds.

Further, this gives you an opportunity to suggest further training or mentorship if you hire the candidate. If you invest creatively in the professional growth of your hires, you will see your efforts rewarded in the form of a dedicated, loyal team member.

The interview process is your singular opportunity to asses the potential of a candidate, and making the wrong choice will result in the dissatisfaction of both the new hire and your management team. To avoid this, ask questions to engage the candidate in dynamic conversation. This will give you the information you need to find the perfect person for the job.

What do you think? What are your favorite questions to ask candidates during a job interview?


About the Author:
Heather R. Huhman is a career expert, experienced hiring manager, and founder & president of Come Recommended, a content marketing and digital PR consultancy for job search and human resources technologies. She is also the instructor of Find Me A Job: How To Score A Job Before Your Friends, author of Lies, Damned Lies & Internships (2011) and#ENTRYLEVELtweet: Taking Your Career from Classroom to Cubicle (2010), and writes career and recruiting advice for numerous outlets.

Why Recruitment Software Doesn’t Pick the Top Candidates

ATS

Recruitment software and Applicant Tracking Systems (ATS) are must-haves in today’s recruitment world. We rely on technology to increase efficiency in nearly all other aspects of our lives, so it only makes sense that we now have software to automate recruitment tracking by handling job applications and resumes electronically.

Using an online recruitment system or ATS allows companies to better organize and streamline the hiring process. But while recruitment software is designed to help save time, reduce errors and ensure proper tracking, it is still unable to perform the single most critical part of the hiring process — picking the top candidate. Technology can only take us so far. In the end, the hiring process will always require a human element to pull the most qualified candidate from a stack of applications.

Email applications still carry an advantage over recruitment software and ATS. They require personal interaction from both sides throughout the entire hiring process. While accepting email applications requires additional time and organization from the employer, in the end, it helps you to more easily pick the top candidate for the job. Employers and candidates alike should take note of the following limitations of recruitment software and ATS:

They act as a funnel

Each new job posting will trigger an average of 1,000 resumes submitted. That is a staggering amount of paperwork, especially if you’re hiring for multiple positions at any particular time.

Recruitment software and ATS act like a funnel, taking in a large amount of applications in the beginning, but quickly narrowing them down to a mere few. This may sound great, but the limitation lies in the software’s ability to accurately determine what qualities and soft skills would make a candidate the best suited for the job. As a result, you end up eliminating qualified applicants who may not have used the exact words or descriptions the system was looking for, sending good talent right out the door.

They force candidates into boxes

People aren’t made to fit inside boxes, and their resumes don’t translate well into such rigid form fields, either. An online recruitment system breaks down the information on an application and organizes it into different “buckets.” If it doesn’t fit, it doesn’t get recorded, and it is never seen by the employer for consideration.

Sometimes the most unexpected information on a resume is the hidden gem that really makes a candidate stand out. For example, maybe a candidate is a certified yoga instructor or holds a national title in chess, but they’re applying for a marketing job. Holding a title in chess displays critical thinking skills, and being a yoga instructor shows the candidate works well with others. But if ATS don’t know to look for these words and identify them as valuable skill sets, they’re sure to be overlooked. One of the most important components to bring to the hiring process is an open mind. ATS do quite the opposite. They use a set of blinders to only focus on the exact keywords that have been pre-established.

They lack the human element

Many of the limitations of online recruitment system is is lack of human interaction. Nearly three-quarters of resumes will never be seen by human eyes.

In order to choose the best person for the job, candidates need to be evaluated much more personally. This is yet another reason why recruitment technology will never be able to fully replace the human element within the hiring process. A computer will tell you who looks best on paper, but only you can decide who possesses the interpersonal skills and personality that makes them the right fit for your company.

They encourage candidates to play the system

When it comes to applying for a new position, the emphasis has shifted. Candidates now want to know how to carefully craft an application that avoids recruitment software and ATS pitfalls. Learning how to “play the system” has taken precedence over simply submitting the most positive, honest representation of yourself.

Worse yet, ATS reward such tactics by bumping candidates with phony, keyword-laden resumes to the top of the stack, regardless of whether they are truly the most qualified. This is yet one more reason why recruitment software doesn’t pick the top candidate.

They discourage great candidates from applying

We can’t overlook the limitations of recruitment software and ATS that so many companies rely on for their hiring process. Sure, they make accepting and sorting applications a breeze, but
picking the top candidate is a subjective decision that no amount of technology can accurately automate. This will always remain up to the employer. Hopeful applicants should also be concerned with these limitations, as they affect whether their resume ever makes it before human eyes.

In the HR world, the hands-on approach still proves to be the most accurate. Stay involved in the hiring process and don’t rely on recruitment software to make one of the most critical decisions for your company!

What do you think? What limitations have you experienced using an online recruitment system as either an employer or a candidate?


About the Author: 
Heather R. Huhman is a career expert, experienced hiring manager, and founder & president of Come Recommended, a content marketing and digital PR consultancy for job search and human resources technologies. She is also the instructor of Find Me A Job: How To Score A Job Before Your Friends, author of Lies, Damned Lies & Internships (2011) and#ENTRYLEVELtweet: Taking Your Career from Classroom to Cubicle (2010), and writes career and recruiting advice for numerous outlets.