Doostang News June 14 – Three Important Interview DON’Ts (DO Read This!)

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Here at Doostang we like to advise you on all the things you should be doing during an interview.  But it’s also important to know what sort of actions you need to avoid.  Some of these may seem obvious, yet jobseekers often make related missteps along the way.  So let’s revisit the basics:

Don’t Under-dress

If you are familiar enough with a company to know that the office culture is very relaxed, it may feel silly walking into an interview in a suit and tie.  Nevertheless, it’s important that you dress up for an interview.  Putting effort into your wardrobe shows that you take the company and the job seriously.  And even if the rest of the office is in shorts and T-shirts, they’ll appreciate that you care enough about the interview to dress up for it.  No one will judge you if you show up looking polished and professional – they might if you dress like a slob.

Don’t Talk on the Phone

It’s obvious that you should, by no means, answer your phone during an interview. But take that a step further and don’t talk on the phone at all while you are visiting a company. Before you even enter the building, switch your phone to silent, or, better yet, turn it off. Not only is it important to do this in order to avoid the temptation of answering it, but also it ensures that your cell won’t go off while you’re speaking with the hiring manager. The interview lasts from the moment you step foot in the door until the moment you leave, and it’s imperative that you show respect and remain alert. Silence is golden!

Don’t Get too Relaxed

While you want to give off an air of confidence, don’t get cocky and start slouching in your chair during the interview.  It’s wonderful to have a fluid, easy-going conversation with an interviewer, but if you are too much at ease, they might think that you don’t really care.  Remain alert and engaged, appearing more eager than cozy.

Stay tuned for more interview “don’ts”, and make sure to brush up on your interview “do’s”.  Now go get ‘em!

Until next time,

The Doostang Team

Comments

  1. says

    This is solid advice. I might take slight issue with the first point, however. I once interviewed with a company where I was asked by three different peopleabout “personal style” and “fitting in with the culture.” I finally realized that they were worried that I’d worn a suit and to an interview with a fairly casual company. I think there are norms in each industry that interviewees need to recognize and honor. I’d wear a tie to a bank interview; but a suit and open collar is formal enough for most Internet shops, for instance.

  2. says

    This is solid advice. I might take slight issue with the first point, however. I once interviewed with a company where I was asked by three different peopleabout “personal style” and “fitting in with the culture.” I finally realized that they were worried that I’d worn a suit and to an interview with a fairly casual company. I think there are norms in each industry that interviewees need to recognize and honor. I’d wear a tie to a bank interview; but a suit and open collar is formal enough for most Internet shops, for instance.

  3. Ann Peterson says

    One more tip: don’t make typos or grammatical errors in your written materials. It’s “T-shirt,” not “t-shirt.” The word comes from the basic shape of the shirt, which looks like a “T.”

    In our shop we will bounce applicants in a heartbeat for typos in their written materials even if their skills and experience look great. Typographic errors look unprofessional and are too costly in our line of work: they are simply unacceptable to our constituency.

    Otherwise, great article, as always!

  4. Ann Peterson says

    One more tip: don’t make typos or grammatical errors in your written materials. It’s “T-shirt,” not “t-shirt.” The word comes from the basic shape of the shirt, which looks like a “T.”

    In our shop we will bounce applicants in a heartbeat for typos in their written materials even if their skills and experience look great. Typographic errors look unprofessional and are too costly in our line of work: they are simply unacceptable to our constituency.

    Otherwise, great article, as always!

  5. says

    Very valid point, Ann, and touché :)
    Typos and grammatical errors will quickly disqualify you from the race so make sure to proofread your resume and cover letter thoroughly. Better yet, have a friend proofread it for you – when you’re staring at the same document for hours it’s easy to miss really simple errors that a fresh pair of eyes could immediately spot.

    - The Doostang Team

  6. says

    Very valid point, Ann, and touché :)
    Typos and grammatical errors will quickly disqualify you from the race so make sure to proofread your resume and cover letter thoroughly. Better yet, have a friend proofread it for you – when you’re staring at the same document for hours it’s easy to miss really simple errors that a fresh pair of eyes could immediately spot.

    - The Doostang Team

  7. Niftyoptionstip says

    Well i think for clearing any interview what you all need is confidence and way of presentation.

    thanks metrogyl.

  8. Niftyoptionstip says

    Well i think for clearing any interview what you all need is confidence and way of presentation.

    thanks metrogyl.

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