How Should I Follow Up After an Interview?

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You had a great interview, and you’re anxious to get an offer—now what?  Following up with the employer is essential. If the company took the time to meet with you, then you’re a qualified candidate and the employer will appreciate your interest in the position. Your follow up is a great opportunity to make any points that you forgot to mention in the interview, and remind the hiring manager why you are a great candidate.

FIND OUT WHAT’S NEXT

When you’re wrapping up the interview, find out when the company expects to make a decision about second interviews and/or filling the position. You should always ask questions during an interview, and understanding the company’s hiring process is essential for making the appropriate follow up.  If you don’t hear from them by the timeframe they give you, you can contact them again to find out their hiring status. Make sure you have the necessary contact information before leaving the interview.

ACT QUICKLY

Send your follow up e-mail and/or letter ASAP. Some employers may be in a hurry to fill the position, and you want to be at the top of their list. Don’t send a generic note; follow up with specifics from the interview, and indicate why you are interested in the job.  If you interviewed with multiple people, reach out to them individually. Thank them for their time, and express your enthusiasm for the position.

Laurie Berenson, President and Founder of Sterling Career Concepts, LLC, offers the following advice to job seekers:

“The most effective follow up letter is not simply a thank for the meeting, but rather a letter that addresses any gaps or concerns that the interviewer may have from your conversation and reiterates why you feel you are a strong candidate for the role. The best way to do this to pull detail in from your conversation to substantiate. If you feel that you could have addressed a question better during the interview, this is your opportunity to do so.”

TRY AGAIN

Be persistent, without being too aggressive.  If you haven’t heard back during the expected timeframe, send a quick follow up e-mail:

Hi Mark,

You mentioned that you expected to make a decision on the Account Executive position by the end of the month, so I wanted to check in with you.  I’m still very interested in the role, so please let me know if I can provide any additional information, or if you have any updates on your hiring timeline moving forward.

Thank you for your time.

Sincerely,

Beth

If you reach out via e-mail and don’t get a response, try leaving a voicemail.  Laney Lyons, author of Don’t Be A Yes Chick!, says “A candidate should follow up from an interview by email, phone and mail unless specifically instructed otherwise. Every hiring manager or business owner responds to mail, email and phone calls differently so you want to follow up using all three methods.“

Don’t harass the employer, but make it clear that you are serious about getting the job.

STAY POSITIVE

Always be friendly and professional when reaching out to a potential employer. You may be frustrated if you aren’t getting a response, but you could still be a potential candidate. Double-check your e-mails for any grammatical or spelling errors. Even if you are no longer being considered for the position you interviewed for, there might be other opportunities or future openings at the company and you want to remain in good standing.

Rebecca West, Owner and Principal Designer at Rivalee Design, agrees: “I also highly recommend sending a thank you when you do not get a position you really wanted. Something short, gracious, and positive can open up a door to another opportunity, either at that company, or by being referred to someone else looking for a great employee.”

What other follow up steps would you suggest?

 

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