Making the Move to Management – How to Move Up

You may be thinking about moving up the scale in terms of a manager’s position and wondering if you have the necessary skills to do it. Maybe you’ve been offered a favorable promotion but you’re unsure if you should take it. Keep in mind that even if somebody else sees you as management material, that doesn’t necessarily mean you have to accept the position if it’s not truly what you want to do. Not everybody is meant to be a boss. And that’s okay if your decision isn’t fear-based. Feeling intimidation or fear of being in a position of power despite wanting it and actually being qualified, shouldn’t keep you from moving up the corporate ladder. If the ‘higher ups’ have offered you a desirable position, or if you’re thinking about making a move towards management, ask yourself the following key questions first:

1. Are you willing and able to work many more hours without any compensation for putting in the overtime?

Even though a promotion to a position in management likely comes with a significant salary increase, it also comes with a bigger time commitment. A higher position often means getting to work earlier and staying later.

2. Are you willing to be accountable for not only your mistakes, but for the mistakes of your subordinates as well?

Naturally, you’ll carefully explain to your employee how to do a certain task you want him to carry out. But that doesn’t mean he won’t make a mistake. Even though everyone is liable for his own mistakes and actions, as a person in power, the responsibility is ultimately yours.

3. How good are you at offering constructive criticism?

When a member of your staff performs poorly or makes a huge mistake, your first instinct may be to either walk away and say nothing, or start yelling at the person. Neither of these approaches will benefit your staff member or you. It’s your job as the boss to properly coach your employee so that they can do better the next time. Clearly explain the problem and what’s not acceptable. In the end, as a manager you have to trust that when you assign another task to someone who previously failed that they will eventually succeed.

4. Can you assign work for people to do? 

If you don’t learn to properly distribute work to others even though you have more responsibility as a manager, it will just make your job that much harder. As the boss, you will share burdens with your staff, some of them undoubtedly unpleasant. That may mean sacrificing things you normally enjoy doing so you can show others how to do certain tasks or projects. You will ultimately be responsible for the work of your subordinates

5. When the time comes, will you be able to fire an employee who has done their job well but must be laid off?

This is likely one of the worst parts of being a manager, especially during tough financial times. However, it must be done. Firing someone for any reason is hard, but it’s particularly difficult when the worker is a great employee.

6. Will you be capable of reprimanding a staff worker for doing something wrong?

Some employees repeatedly arrive late everyday, generally misbehave, or spend entirely too much of their working time online. Nobody wants to be the bad guy, but it is indeed the job of the manager to ensure that everyone is doing what they’re supposed to be doing.

7. Can you fire a staff member for not doing their job well?

It may sound easy to fire someone who isn’t doing their job well. However, in spite of their lack of performance, you may start to think about their mortgage, family, and bills they have to pay. Suddenly, it seems more complicated, but you are the boss and it must be done. If you’ve tried to help someone improve their overall performance and it didn’t work, then it’s your responsibility to let them go. Period.

Moving up to management involves careful consideration as it’s a lot to handle. Consider these questions and answer them honestly before you make your next move.

About the Author: this post comes from Sarah, a writer and consultant with Naked Business Consulting, a company that focuses on franchise consulting, raising capital and international expansions. Apart from reading books on management every week, Sarah likes to practice her golf swing when she gets a chance, as well as learning more about the internet.

Comments

  1. Janet Brown says

    This excerpt was very helpful. Thank you for sending it. For years, I’ve considered applying for management jobs, but wasn’t sure. This was written very clearly about what a Manager’s job entails and helped me to envision that position more clearly.

    Thank you again.

  2. Dante Pinnock says

    I have been looking to apply for managerial positions but have had no luck in landing one due to lack of experience. But how do you gain the experience if you dont get the opportunity? In reference to the excerpt you have definitely clarified some of the roles of management responsibilities and I am more than sure that I fit the part.

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