Your List of Entry-Level Accounting and Finance Jobs for 2014: Part 2 of 3

Your List of Entry-Level Accounting and Finance Jobs for 2014: Part 2 of 3

This is the second in our three-part series on entry-level finance and accounting jobs to consider for recent or soon-to-be graduates with 4-year accounting or finance degrees. In part one, we covered entry-level jobs in the field of accounting and the insurance industry along with the median income for these jobs as estimated by the Bureau of Labor and Statistics (BLS). Here we will discuss opportunities available in the finance and banking niches. The final post will review other jobs in the private and public sectors.

Entry-Level Finance Jobs

If you plan to head to Wall Street or work for a top firm in the finance industry there are a wide variety of entry-level positions to consider. Some of the best jobs often go to candidates with MBAs, but prior experience in the finance industry might get you a shot at positions with the top firms.

Money manager. If helping organizations manage different types of investments, investment pools or mutual funds appeals to you, look into entry-level money manager opportunities. Money managers typically specialize in a specific type of investment or program such as investment portfolio management, portfolio sales or hedge fund analysis. The BLS didn’t provide a median income for money managers, but compensation is based on performance. So if you work hard, know your niche and do your research, a money manager job could net you well into the six figures over time.

Financial advisor or financial planner. Would you prefer to work with individuals versus corporations? Then a financial advisor job might be up your alley. Personal financial advisors help people decide where and when to invest their money over the short- and/or long-term, much like financial analysts do for corporations. Median Income: $64,750.

Stockbroker. Along with your 4-year degree, you’ll need to have thick skin, enjoy squashing the competition and excel at networking to succeed in the highly competitive securities industry. Successful stockbrokers earn a healthy living but on-the-job stress can take its toll. Median Income: $70,190.

Financial analyst. Financial analyst jobs come in all shapes and sizes and specialties. If you are comfortable immersing yourself in large volumes of data, can grasp and communicate complex economic and financial insights and are able to formulate sound recommendations based on your research – consider a job as a financial analyst. Long hours, travel to unglamorous locales and a nice paycheck are typical “perks” of entry-level financial analyst jobs. Median Income: $74,350.

Entry-Level Banking Jobs

The world of banking also offers a plethora of opportunities for recent college grads. Whether you’re leaning toward working at one of the top investment banking firms, one of the “big banks” (think Chase, Citi, Wells Fargo, U.S. Bank, etc.) or a local community bank, an entry-level banking position can open the door for a number of finance career paths down the road.

Investment banking analyst. Competition is tough for entry-level investment banking analyst jobs, much like financial analyst positions – because they both pay well. I-banking analysts perform similar duties to financial analysts, performing research and creating reports, but focus specifically on securities. Median Income: the BLS didn’t provide median income for this position specifically, however these jobs fall into the same pay scale range as financial analysts, so expect a similar median income of $74,350.

Mortgage underwriter. Like insurance underwriters, mortgage underwriters evaluate risk to determine whether to issue a mortgage and under what terms. If you’re interested in a mortgage banking career, an entry-level mortgage underwriter job could be a good start. Median Income: $56,490 (included under the same category as loan officer).

Loan officer. Loan officers at financial institutions perform some risk analysis duties in conjunction with underwriters, but also work directly with individuals and businesses requesting loans (home, business, vehicle, etc.) to make sure paperwork is properly filled out and to review loan options. Median Income: $56,490.

Credit analyst. Another type of financial analyst role, entry-level credit analysts research companies to determine whether they are a safe risk and make recommendations to financial institutions as to whether they should set up a lending arrangement with the business in question. Median Income: again, no specific entry from the BLS, but we estimate pay scale range would be similar to or less than typical financial analysts.

Financial examiner or bank examiner. Would you like to review the books and financial transactions of financial institutions? Look for entry-level financial examiner jobs. These examiners review financial statements, transactions and more to determine if the institution is in compliance with government regulations. Median Income: $74,940.

Part three of this series will cover entry-level finance and accounting jobs in the general private and public sectors.

Ready to start your job search now? Visit Doostang’s website and sign up today – it just takes 30 seconds.

Photo Source: Shutterstock

Resources:

“Occupational Outlook Handbook.” United States Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. Available at http://www.bls.gov/ooh/. Accessed Nov. 29, 2013.

Your List of Entry-Level Accounting and Finance Jobs for 2014: Part 1 of 3

Your List of Entry-Level Accounting and Finance Jobs for 2014

Another round of accounting and finance majors are set to secure their undergraduate diplomas in the coming weeks. Next up? Recent grads will either head to graduate school or start looking for a job. If you’re a soon-to-be graduate, in search of entry-level accounting and finance jobs, what type of position appeals to you?

The competition is stiff for new graduates, so having options doesn’t hurt. You may not get your dream job straight out of the gate, but getting experience to further your finance career will help you advance to top accounting and finance jobs down the road.

We’ve compiled a list of jobs for you to peruse, along with median income expectations from the Bureau of Labor and Statistics’ (BLS) most recent research.

In the first part of this three-part series, we will review jobs in accounting and those in the insurance sector. Parts two and three will cover jobs in finance, banking and other positions available in the private and public sectors.

Entry-Level Accounting Jobs

Graduates with 4-year accounting degrees are in demand and have a better chance of finding work than many other recent grads according to research from the University of California, San Diego. If you’re looking at options for entry-level accounting jobs, you might consider the following positions.

Accounts payable, accounts receivable clerk. These positions require little to no experience and many positions only require a high school diploma. If you’re looking for a position to help pay the bills until a better paying gig comes along or for a way to get your foot in the door at a prestigious company, consider an AP/AR job. Median Income: $34,030.

Accountant. A wide variety of accountant positions exist in private and public corporations as well as at government agencies. Possible job titles include accounting generalist, cost accountant, tax accountant, accounting manager, corporate controller, corporate accountant, certified public accountant (CPA) and more. Read this recent post for a detailed breakdown of entry-level accounting career options. Median Income: $61,690.

Auditor. The Wall Street meltdown was followed by a series of new regulatory and compliance requirements via the Sarbanes-Oxley and Dodd-Frank Acts, meaning the government is keeping closer watch on how businesses handle money. This has lead to a rise in the number of auditor positions available across all industries and sectors. If reviewing financial statements and minding city, state and federal legislation intrigues you, consider a role as an auditor. Median Income: $61,690.

Entry-Level Insurance Jobs

Insurance is another industry sector that employs accounting and finance professionals. Job security is typically one of the perks for hard-working pros in the insurance industry. Along with a variety of financial analyst opportunities, consider these entry-level jobs if you’re interested in working in insurance.

Underwriter. Simply put, the insurance underwriter reviews actuarial findings to determine whether the insurance company should issue an insurance policy to an individual or organization. They also recommend insurance premiums based on the level of risk calculated for the proposed insured. Median Income: $59,290.

Actuary or actuarial analyst. Actuaries may work in other industry sectors, but are most often associated with insurance. If you enjoy making sense of large volumes of data and forecasting risk (of death, injury, illness, property loss, etc.) based on your research, a career as an actuary might be a good fit for you. Median Income: $87,650.

Part two of this series will cover entry-level finance and accounting jobs in finance and banking. We will close out the series in part 3, looking at others accounting and finance positions in the private and public sectors.

Ready to start your job search now? Visit Doostang’s website and sign up today – it just takes 30 seconds.

Photo Source: Shutterstock

Resources:

“Occupational Outlook Handbook.” United States Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. Available at http://www.bls.gov/ooh/. Accessed Nov. 29, 2013.

Entry-Level Finance Jobs: 5 Steps to Secure Your Future

Entry-Level Finance Jobs: 5 Steps to Secure Your Future

So you’ve landed your first job after graduation, and your finance career is preparing to launch, congratulations! Keep in mind that your first job is but one step toward a successful, long-term career in finance. Along with working hard on the job, you should take additional steps along the way to reach your goals.

1. Continue learning and achieving education toward additional degrees and/or certifications. Kudos to you for receiving your 4-year undergraduate degree, that’s one of the first steps that you need to take if you want to get ahead in the finance industry. But learning doesn’t stop with your first diploma.

Depending on which career path you’re traveling down, you will need additional coursework, degrees and certifications to advance to the top finance and accounting jobs. Want to secure that senior financial analyst gig? An MBA can help you get there. Is the certified public accountant (CPA) route in your future? Plan on studying for your CPA exam, now.

Interested in working in investments and selling securities? You’ll need to study for and pass your series 7 and 63 exams as required by the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA). Other finance jobs require additional certifications, too, and FINRA has clearly established guidelines and regulations for professionals working in these roles . Your employer typically will sponsor you and have a process in place to help you to attain these goals.

2. Strive to get assignments on high-profile projects and with the top teams. If you want to stand out, you need to continually prove yourself as someone who contributes in a big way. Those are the people who put in the long hours and are resourceful. Learn everything you possibly can about your employer’s business.

Do your research and find out what you can do to position yourself as a change maker who can get things done and contribute to the bottom line. Keep your ears open, ask questions and try to spend time with influencers so you hear about the hot projects or assignments first. That way you can raise your hand when teams are set up or assignments are dealt.

3. Build a strong digital presence and be visible online. It’s smart to make your mark at the organization where you start out, because it might put you in line for promotion. But if you plan to seek out opportunities with different companies in town or across the nation, you need to promote your personal brand online.

Take the time to develop a robust profile on LinkedIn and join groups for finance professionals. Post content, comment on group discussions and connect with people who work at companies you would like to associate with. Combine this with a professional Twitter profile and take part in online forums and discussions about the finance industry regularly. Just be visible. This is also a good time to clean up your digital profiles so your past life doesn’t come back to haunt you (you know those pictures we’re talking about).

4. Attend finance industry networking events on a regular basis. While what you know can help you get your foot in the door early in your finance career, it’s who you know that will help get you a promotion or a better job somewhere else.

Build your network of professional relationships outside of the office by attending networking events and volunteering to organize or help out at future get-togethers or charitable activities. Networking groups provide an excellent opportunity to meet new people in the finance industry and stay on top of the latest news.

5. Don’t burn bridges. Even some of the best and brightest people have been fired or left positions on “not the best of terms” – do the names Steve Jobs, mayor Michael Bloomberg or super bowl winning coach Bill Belichick ring a bell? Losing a job can happen to anyone. And just about everyone has dealt with some backstabbing at the office.

Take the high road and know that everything isn’t always going to come up daisies or go your way. If you have a negative experience with a company or individual, try to suck it up, keep any vitriol to yourself and move on. The pain will ease over time, and your grace under duress will impress.

Remembering the Golden Rule doesn’t hurt either. Treating everyone the way you would like to be treated is never a bad idea. The person you do a bad turn to today, may be the person who decides whether you get hired, fired or passed over tomorrow.

Photo Source: Shutterstock

Resources:

FINRA Registration and Examination Requirements. Financial Industry Regulatory Authority website. Available at http://www.finra.org/industry/compliance/registration/qualificationsexams/qualifications/p011051. Accessed Nov. 25, 2013.

Entry-Level Accounting Jobs for Recent College Grads

Entry-Level Accounting Jobs for Recent College GradsIf you’re a recent college graduate with a 4-year accounting degree, current job prospects are brighter for you than many other college grads. In fact, accountant and auditor jobs recently ranked No. 4 on UC San Diego’s HOT Careers list. This report looked at which positions college grads would have the best chance at securing without needing additional education.1

Entry-level accounting jobs and internships come in a wide variety of shapes and sizes, or should we say industries and job titles. If you are ready start your job search, but aren’t sure which type of accounting position to pursue, here’s a breakdown of some of the top jobs available for recent grads with 4-year accounting degrees.

Accountant Jobs

You graduated with an accounting degree, so a job as an accountant is pretty obvious, right? Consider looking for a job as an in-house accountant, or put your accounting skills to work for your city, state or federal government.2 Accountant positions typically fall into one of the following categories:

Generalist. If you would like the opportunity to perform a wide range of accounting tasks, look for a general accounting job. These positions come with variety and may give you the responsibility of managing other accounting staff.

Specialist. If you prefer to focus on a specific area of accounting, consider seeking out work as a specialist such as a cost accountant, tax accountant or auditor.

General Ledger. If you see yourself managing a corporation’s general ledger, preparing financial reports and overseeing the work of accounts-payable and accounts-receivable clerks, then look for work as a general ledger accountant. This position might also be referred to as a chief accountant, accounting manager, corporate controller or corporate accountant.

CPA (certified public accountant) Jobs

If you live and breathe accounting and want to work for a company that specializes in your field, consider becoming a CPA, and apply for work at a CPA firm. Or if you want to obtain a more advanced accounting position for a private corporation or the government, a CPA license might give you the leverage you need.

In order to be certified as a CPA, you will need to pass the CPA exam and work in the field for a minimum period of time, as determined by the state where you live. Many CPA firms will hire new accounting grads for entry-level CPA positions, even without a license. However, the new hire must currently be studying for his or her certification or start the process once they are on the job.

CPAs can find work in a variety of capacities and specialty areas – whether at a CPA firm, private company or government agency. According to the American Institute for Certified Public Accountants (AICPA), CPAs can support businesses in a number of ways:

- Assurance Services

- Consulting Services

- Information Technology Services

- Forensic Accounting

- Environmental Accounting

- International Accounting

- Tax and Financial Planning3

If you hope to advance your career in accounting, obtaining your CPA license can help give you an edge over the competition.

Financial Analyst Jobs

While you may need a finance degree (and an MBA) to secure a financial analyst position at one of the top finance firms, private corporations in industries such as manufacturing, e-commerce, health care, utilities and others often hire recent accounting graduates for financial analyst positions.

Entry-level financial analyst jobs don’t require prior experience, but you can expect to work a lot of hours. The median income for a financial analyst comes in at about $75,000 per year, which makes these positions highly desirable and helps take the sting out of the long hours.

If you are a strong researcher, who excels at creating detailed financial reports and can make sense of large volumes of data, a financial analyst position might be right for you.

Recent college grads with 4-year accounting degrees have an abundance of career options to choose from today. If you’re looking for the best entry-level accounting and finance jobs, visit the Doostang website, and start searching for accounting jobs and finance careers now. We specialize in helping recent accounting and finance graduates get hired.

Photo Source: Shutterstock

Sources:

1. DeVries, H., MBA; Baru, S, Ph.D.; Shapiro, J., Ph.D. “HOT Careers for College Grads and Returning Students 2014,” (special report). 2013. UC San Diego Extension. Available at http://extension.ucsd.edu/about/index.cfm?vAction=reports. Accessed Nov. 18, 2013.

2. Cohn, M. “Top Entry-Level Accounting and Finance Jobs.” Accounting Today website; May 29, 2013. Available at http://www.accountingtoday.com/news/Top-Entry-Level-Accounting-Finance-Jobs-62796-1.html. Accessed Nov. 18, 2013.

3. “What Does a CPA Do?” Pennsylvania Institute for Certified Public Accountants website. Available at http://www.picpa.org/content/38406.aspx. Accessed Nov. 18, 2013.

4. “Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2012-13 Edition, Financial Analysts.” Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor. Available at http://www.bls.gov/ooh/business-and-financial/financial-analysts.htm. Accessed Nov. 18, 2013.

Accounting Jobs Rank High on 2013 UC San Diego HOT Careers List

Accounting Jobs Rank High on 2013 UC San Diego HOT Careers List

One of the biggest challenges for college grads is to find a job when they don’t have experience working in their field. In the February 2013 issue of the Monthly Labor Review, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that 12.6 percent of recent college graduates under the age of 30 were unemployed, and lack of real world experience often holds them back.1

This factor isn’t necessarily true for all occupations, though. The University of California, San Diego (UCSD) recently released a report that would help college students identify career options that required a minimal need for supplemental experience or education. In its report, “HOT Careers for College Grads and Returning Students 2013,” the school compiled a list of “HOT Careers” that took into account the ability to secure a job after graduation with little on-the-job experience or an advanced degree.2

UCSD refers to this factor as “bridgeability,” and it is based on “whether a college graduate could bridge into a career with one or two years of study or reskilling.”

The school also considered four other factors in their evaluation, including:

Current rates of employment.

Projected growth for jobs in the field.

Median wage for jobs in the field.

Typical work environments in the field.2

These four factors could each contribute up to 25 points to the total score of 100. The “bridgeability” factor then came into play. If the occupation in question didn’t fit “bridgeability” guidelines, it didn’t make the list.2

How Did Jobs in Accounting and Finance Fare?

If you’re a recent college graduate looking for an entry-level accounting job and a role as an accountant or auditor is your goal, congratulations! Accountants and auditors fell under one umbrella and landed at No. 4 on the list, with a total of 67 points. Careers focused on software development (71.4 points) and market research analysis (69.5 points) topped the list.2

For graduates looking for entry-level finance jobs, two occupation categories also made the HOT Careers list. Financial analysts ranked No. 11 with a total of 57.7 points and Securities/Commodities/Financial Services Sales Agents came in at No. 14 with 54.6 total points. Both of these finance careers ranked high in median wage, with each scoring 20 points, but the current levels of employment weren’t nearly as high as for the accountant/auditor category.

Why Are Accountants and Auditors So “HOT?”

The accountant/auditor occupation ranked the highest in points across all occupations listed for current rates of employment with a score of 22.5. According to the UCSD report, 1,129,340 people in the U.S. were employed in these occupations at last count and growth rate for the field is strong with a rate of 16 percent projected by 2020. Finally, accountants and auditors can expect to see a nice growth in salary as well, as the mean salary (presently $71,040) has increased by close to $10,000 in the past three years.

If you are preparing to launch a career in finance or accounting, your prospects are brighter than many other fields. Across the board, the number of open positions remains high, pay rates are competitive to high, salary growth estimates are solid and opportunities for career advancement abound.

For recent college graduates in accounting and finance, the “bridgeability” factor is also working in your favor. And if you’re looking to secure one of the more coveted positions in finance or accounting, Doostang can help give you the edge. We specialize in helping recent college graduates with bachelor degrees and MBAs stand out from the competition.

Photo Source: Shutterstock

Sources:

1. Spreen, LT. “Recent college graduates in the U.S. labor force: data from the Current Population Survey.” Bureau of Labor Statistics, Monthly Labor Review. 2013 Feb. Vol. 136, No. 2. Available at http://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2013/02/mlr201302.pdf. Accessed Oct. 24, 2013.

2.  DeVries, H., MBA; Baru, S, Ph.D.; Shapiro, J., Ph.D. “HOT Careers for College Grads and Returning Students 2014,” (special report). 2013. UC San Diego Extension. Available at http://extension.ucsd.edu/about/index.cfm?vAction=reports. Accessed Oct. 24, 2013.

6 Blunders that Push Your Resume to the “Don’t Call” List

 

Many candidates unintentionally push their resume into the “don’t call” pile with several common errors. Many of these blunders are based on outdated thinking while others develop out of a desire to take advantage of that one moment when the hiring manager is screening your resume. Take a few moments and review your resume to make sure these blunders aren’t pushing your resume to the wrong pile!

1. Including Everything

Less is more with effective resumes. Don’t try to cram in all your work history or every keyword that comes to mind. Trying to include everything will only sabotage your resume by essentially hiding your good points under the weight of too much information. Most hiring managers only skim resumes, and if you have created an information overload the screening process is very likely to stop right there.

Change your thinking about your resume to create an effective hiring tool. Good resumes capture the reader’s attention while enticing them to learn more about you. Regurgitating your entire work history onto the page is not going to achieve that aim for you. Limit your work history to the last 10 to 15 years to be most effective.

2. Poor Organization

Including everything is indeed a form of poor organization. However, limiting the work history to the last 15 years may not be sufficient to reduce the amount of verbiage. Aim for a concise and succinct description of your jobs. Include no more than 5 lines in each description. Make the most of the prime real estate on your resume by including brief company descriptions as well. Doing so provides a context for your experience and accomplishments while saving space. Separate out accomplishments by highlighting a few well-chosen achievements in bullets.

3. Grouping All Jobs Together

You may have a great progression of positions with increasing responsibility at a particular company. In order to get the most out of these experiences, separate out each position with its own job description and achievements listed. You limit the effectiveness of your resume by putting all positions with the same company together. Not only is your clear progression blurred, but the reader may also be confused as to exactly what your contributions were. Unclear descriptions of past contributions do nothing in helping potential employers envision you as a successful member of their team.

4. Functional Format

Many job seekers choose a functional format that can also be confusing to the reader. A functional format does not present a clear progression of your career and requires the reader to invest more time in trying to determine what experiences match with each company. Although you want the reader to spend more time reading your resume, the functional format is not a productive way to achieve that goal. Using a reverse chronological format provides a quick snapshot of your history, and with careful presentation will entice the reader to keep reading and call you to learn more.

5. Cluttered Presentation

Many of these points address the issue of clutter in your resume. Additional factors to consider in presenting a clean appearance in your resume include how to manage the dates of employment. As long as you have a steady progression in your work history, including only the years of employment is the cleanest presentation. However, if you have had a number of short-term positions, including the month and year may help illustrate the actual length of employment.

Another common example of clutter on the resume is attempting to include every keyword you can associate with your profession. Be selective in your choice of keywords, using only those that clearly demonstrate your strengths.

Finally, including too much information about professional development experiences can work against you. Identify those training experiences that set you apart from the competition and include only those. Dates are typically not necessary for professional development activities, particularly for annual trainings.

6. Unprofessionalism

You must remember that you are being evaluated in every single contact you make with a potential employer. Personal email addresses such as sexygirl@ or lazyguy@ should never be used in your job search. Email accounts can be set up for free at many sites on the web. Setting up a new email account dedicated to your job search is a great idea to help you stay organized as well. An appropriate email address can be as simple as YourName@ and conveys a much more professional image.

Other unprofessional tactics include talking on the phone with prospective employers while at your current job or with dogs and kids in the background. Avoid these traps that could easily land your resume in the “don’t call” pile.

Making the most of your resume is the best tool for getting a call from the hiring manager. The resume is a carefully crafted calling card and with the right balance of information and presentation can spur the hiring manager to the action you desire. Make smart choices about what to include and how to present information in an effective way to gain the response you want. A strategic review and re-vamping of your resume may be just what you need to prompt that call. You have the power to make sure your resume is in the “Must Call” pile!

Up Close and Too Personal – What to Leave OFF Your Resume

A resume serves as a reflection of who you are:  it contains your education, your illustrious work experience, various ways to contact you…  But then, a resume should never really reflect who you are.  We’re talking about the personal details – the little things that make you the fabulous person you are today, but that should really have no bearing on landing a job.

So whether you’re just starting to apply to jobs for the first time, or are a seasoned job search veteran, here’s a refresher course on things that you should never include on your resume:

Religion

If you’re not applying to a job at a religious institution, keep your views off the page.  It’s irrelevant to the job, and hiring managers are not allowed to take it under consideration anyway, so there’s really no place for it.  If you volunteer at a religious organization and you consider this experience especially relevant to the job you’re applying to, you can mention it briefly.  However, if you must include it, keep the organization anonymous and focus on your role instead.  For example:

Volunteer Instructor – once a week, taught a classroom of thirty children, ages 10-12.

Also, keep in mind that anything you mention in the resume is likely to come up during the interview, so include this information at your own risk.

Politics

Again, if you’re not going into politics, leave it off.  These sorts of matters are controversial in the first place, are irrelevant, and if anything, just take up valuable space.  Like with religion, if you consider your political experience extra valuable and relevant to a particular job – and just can’t bear to take it off the resume – avoid mentioning the organization name, and be prepared to discuss further during an interview.

Sexual Orientation

Sexual preference may be a key component to who you are, but it has nothing to do with how well you can perform on the job.  More than this, even though discrimination in the workplace is illegal, it still exists in some places, so don’t take your chances.

Age

Though you may be the perfect fit for the position, ageism in the workplace certainly exists, and you may be eliminated from the pool prematurely if you are perceived as being too old or too young.  If age is an issue, be cautious with including specific dates on your resume as well (most hiring managers can do the math).  So if your 30-year college reunion is around the corner, you might want to keep that graduation date to yourself and also leave off some of your early, less relevant experience.

Health and Disabilities

The law protects persons with health issues or disabilities, but again, you should leave this information off of your resume.  It’s irrelevant and opportunity for discrimination exists.

Criminal Record

The general rule with a criminal record is to be upfront and honest with a hiring manager, but the resume is not the place for this.  Wait until the interview to bring this up.

While you want to give the hiring manager a good idea of who you are, there’s definitely a point where you can become too personal in what you decide to disclose.  Always aim to flaunt how great you are on your resume – just be a bit discerning while you do it.

 

Doostang Success — My Dream Job after Just One Week

Crystal

Georgetown University ’10
Financial Analytics Generalist – Bloomberg L.P.

“For me, Doostang was an amazing resource because it offered two critical factors that helped me propel a successful job search: credibility and visibility.

I wanted to make my job search as efficient as possible, and I chose Doostang because it was recommended to me by a trusted and highly accomplished friend from a leading university and career, who was also a site member. So credibility was a big piece that got me started.

Every few days or so, for about a month, I re-ran a search based on my criteria, shortlisted promising jobs and companies, and took the time to apply at the end of each week.

Ultimately, I was contacted back by a great company for a cool role, and offered a job just one week later after several interviews. I realized throughout the interview process that this was a dream company for me.

That said – what I also loved about Doostang is that it let me manage my entire job search from a single online location, and its extensive database of high quality jobs enabled me to consider opportunities I wouldn’t have thought of applying to otherwise (including the one that I ultimately obtained).

I would particularly recommend Doostang to people who are in a similar situation I was recently in: open to a range of types of opportunities that will propel your career, and wanting immediate and efficient access to a tried and true job board and resource recommended by top graduates and professionals.

Doostang really opened up my eyes to the wide variety of opportunities out there, and I couldn’t be happier with the outcome!”


Did you get a job through Doostang? Share your Doostang success story and get a $500 Signing Bonus from Doostang!

Here’s a small sample of the great jobs you’ll find on Doostang:

Research Analyst – Powerful Financial Firm, New York, NY

Sales & Marketing Intern – Renowned Internet Company, San Francisco, CA

Investment Manager – International Private Equity Firm, Italy

Contract Consultant – Preeminent Research/Advisory Company, San Francisco, CA

Legal Administrative Analyst – Renowned Investment Firm, Chicago, IL

Search jobs on Doostang

Doostang Success — My Dream Job in Venture Capital

Himani

UC Berkeley, 2010
Investment Analyst – Hercules Technology Growth Capital

“I ended up at Doostang after trying multiple job seeking platforms. The experience here was so much more interactive, unlike other places that felt like a black hole – sucking my applications with no response.

In contrast, at Doostang I was impressed by features like status notifications, which showed me when my resume was downloaded and which employer viewed it.

There is a great amount of credibility in Doostang, so I could be sure that my unique skill sets and qualifications would reach the right set of employers.

I’ve been ‘job watching’ for almost 2 years, and I’ve never seen such a relevant aggregation of specific ‘field-positions’ until Doostang.

Their investment management space in finance has the most updated and selective postings. And that’s how I landed my job at Hercules Technology Growth Capital. Doostang has been an ideal platform for me to end up at my dream job in venture capital.

Kudos to the team, and sincere thanks.”


Did you get a job through Doostang? Share your Doostang success story and get a $500 Signing Bonus from Doostang!

Here’s a small sample of the great jobs you’ll find on Doostang:

Finance Intern – Leading Capital Placement Firm, New York, NY

Sr. Marketing Analyst – Leading Ecommerce Retailer, Boston, MA

Start-Up Hedge Fund Operations Associate – Start-Up Hedge Fund, Manhattan, NY

Chief Executive Officer – Rising Nonprofit Educator, Charleston, SC

Entry Level Treasury Analyst – Top-Tier Financial Company, San Diego, CA

Search jobs on Doostang

Doostang Success — A Great Job after 3 Years of Unemployment

Ryan

Baruch College (MS), 2011
Analyst – REIS

“After getting laid off in 2008 from my financial services job, it seemed impossible to get back into the business world. I applied for hundreds of jobs and couldn’t even get an interview or even a response. After three years of unemployment and exhausting almost every avenue I knew of, a friend recommended Doostang to me.

Within two months I went on three interviews, got two job offers, accepted one and I am now back to work full time.

Doostang is by far the best job site I ever used. Every job listing on this site is legit, there is no ‘work from home and make 10K/month’ type listings. If you see it on Doostang it means that company is looking for someone right now. I already got my father and two of my friends using it too, worth every penny!”


Did you get a job through Doostang? Share your Doostang success story and get a $500 Signing Bonus from Doostang!

Here’s a small sample of the great jobs you’ll find on Doostang:

Investment Banking Analyst – Leading Diversified Financial Services Company, New York, NY

Marketing Coordinator – International Law Firm, Miami, FL

Financial Research Assistant – Premier Global Financial Services Company, Philadelphia, PA

Capital Markets Analyst – Preeminent Real Estate Company, Houston, TX

Venture Manager – Premier Financial Firm, New York, NY

Search jobs on Doostang