Tips for Graduates with the “Wrong” Degree

Investment Analyst, Washington, DC
Analyst, Chicago, IL
Jr. Trade Support, New York, NY
Lead Digital Strategist, Raleigh, NC
Finance Marketing Intern, Los Angeles, CA

More recent jobs you might like…

Many of us graduated college with a degree that we were passionate about, only to discover that our area of study was difficult to apply to the job market.  Perhaps you majored in Philosophy or Creative Writing, leaving you to feel a bit hopeless when applying to jobs in the Finance or Technology sector.  But there are always exceptions to the rule, as well as steps you can take to turn yourself into a great candidate.  Read ahead:

Gain Experience

Sure, it’s great to come in armed with the proper knowledge right out of college, but as many will tell you, real world experience is actually more valuable than book smarts.  If you’re gunning for a job that’s out of the realm of your college degree, find ways to gain experience in that field.  This may mean taking a lower level position or an internship (which you may be able to parlay into a career), or even volunteering.

Research

Some individuals lament over their lack of familiarity with a particular subject matter, and consequently rule out jobs before they even consider applying.  But there is nothing to stop you from learning the ins and outs of a particular field on your own – familiarize yourself with the industry, keep up with relevant literature and current events, and teach yourself some pertinent skills.  This kind of self-education will make you more qualified and display great initiative on your part.

Transferable Skills

Don’t dismiss the importance of transferable skills in helping you land your dream job.  There are many skills that transfer nicely from industry to industry, and you should identify yours and make sure to highlight them on your resume. Companies love diversity, and candidates that garnered desirable skills in new and different ways are often far more attractive than the cookie-cutter applicants that companies receive day in and day out.

Network

You’ve heard that it’s much easier to get a job if you know someone on the inside.  One of the reasons this is so important is because this person can vouch for you and cover questions that may arise in regards to your knowledge or experience.  Though you may not have the right educational background for a job, there are probably reasons why you can do the job as well as (or even better than) other qualified candidates – reasons that, unfortunately, may never come up on your resume or cover letter.  If you know someone in the right industry who is aware of this fact, they can advocate on your behalf and inform the company about your talents and qualifications.

Not everyone has the foresight at 18 to know exactly what they want to do with their life and to properly pick a major that will catapult their career.  And some of us stuck more to what captivated our attention than to what seemed practical.  But if you play it right, your unorthodox degree can become a great asset for you in the job search.

Until next time,

The Doostang Team

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Tips for Staying Organized

Research Analyst, New York, NY
Experienced Consultant, Chicago, IL
Sr. Accountant, Greenwich, CT
Strategy Intern, Birmingham, AL
Analyst, San Francisco, CA

More recent jobs you might like…

For many, the constant fight to stay organized can cause stress and cut productivity.  Worse still, it can lead individuals to make mistakes that can have grave consequences for their jobs.  If this sounds like a problem you struggle with, read on for some tips on how to cut the clutter out of your life.

Track, List, and Sort

One of the best ways to stay on top of your projects and deadlines is by developing a system that allows you to track what you have to do and where you stand in terms of getting it done.  Consider creating a list outlining all your projects and their respective due dates.  Alternatively, designate a file or bin for all of the paperwork that you need to go through, and place the most important stuff on top.  Once you’ve done this, make sure to check things off your list as you get them done, or move projects from one bin to another once they have been addressed.

Regroup

While in the midst of your work, it’s helpful to take a few breathers where you pause to consider what you’ve completed and what still needs to be done.  Doing so ensures that you don’t get distracted or miss anything important.  This is where your list or designated project bin will be helpful.

Take Advantage of Every Minute

There are many tasks that can be completed in a short period of time, such as filing documents, shooting off a few quick emails, or making copies.  So instead of putting off these small activities for a later date, do them while you’re thinking about them and likely have a few moments to spare.  Putting them aside for later will only create a backlog of tedious work.

Create Space

There’s nothing worse than losing yourself under a pile of papers.  Try to free up space on your desk by creating files or bins into which you can sort random piles of papers.  This will also help you to track down important documents more easily when you need them.

Throw it Away!

When things start to pile up, take some time to go through everything and throw stuff away.  A good rule is that if you haven’t looked at something in several months, or if you’re unsure about a particular document but it’s something you can easily replace, toss it.  People get attached to their paperwork or worry that they might need it at a later date, and ultimately just end up creating more of a mess than anything else.  Don’t be afraid to utilize your trash bin!

The problem with staying organized is that it’s not a one-time overhaul.  Rather, it’s an ongoing process where you constantly have to make lists, shuffle papers around, and throw things away.  But if you get into good habits now, staying organized won’t seem so trying later on!

Keep it clean,

The Doostang Team

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Doostang Success — Sales Analyst Job with Morgan Stanley

Brandon

Villanova University, 2009
Sales Analyst – Morgan Stanley

“I signed up for Doostang a few months ago out of curiosity to see what opportunities were out there. Even though I wasn’t actively looking at the time, Doostang helped spark my interest in other career paths. The website is very useful in that I was able to locate an opening for a job as soon as it became available, thus giving me an advantage over individuals who may see the position after it has already been posted for some time.

I received a job at Morgan Stanley shortly after applying to it on Doostang and have been very pleased with my experience.”


Did you get a job through Doostang? Share your Doostang success story and get a $500 Signing Bonus from Doostang!

Here’s a small sample of the great jobs you’ll find on Doostang:

Investment Banking Analyst – Premier Full Service Investment Bank, New York, NY

Marketing Intern – LA-Based Boutique Investment Bank, Los Angeles, CA

Entry Level Financial Analyst – Leading Financial Consultancy, Philadelphia, PA

Sales/Business Development Associate – Leading PPC Program Developer, Chicago, IL

Operations Associate – Premier Asset Management Firm, San Francisco, CA

Search jobs on Doostang

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Update Your Job Search Strategies

By Alesia Benedict, CPRW, JCTC – GetInterviews.com

Research Associate, New York, NY
Marketing Analyst/ Associate, Boston, MA
Investment Banking Associate, San Francisco, CA
Research Analyst, Chicago, IL
Senior Analyst, Hanover, NH

More recent jobs you might like…

Making a change in jobs can be challenging at any time in your career, but may feel even more daunting for those who have been with a particular company for a relatively long time. Putting together an effective job search and resume can be difficult for workers who may not have been out in the job market recently. A few strategic tips can help you position yourself as a viable candidate while reducing potential vulnerability to ageism.

Use dates and years of experience judiciously.

It is not necessary to include dates of graduation, professional training, or membership in professional associations. Simply listing these credentials is acceptable. It is not in your best interest to describe your vast experience in terms of 25 or 30 years of experience.  Consider describing experience with adjectives such as “broad”, “deep”, or “expansive” instead. Simply put, try not to call attention to your age, but rather your skills and expertise.

Limit the length of your work history.

Most hiring managers are only interested in the last 10 to 15 years of your experience. You may feel great pride in accomplishments early in your career, but highlighting your status as “rookie of the year” from 1987 is more likely to hurt than help your job search. Including points such as these could brand you as outdated, which may quickly end your consideration for employment.

Tailor the cover letter.

Individualize the cover letter by using the name of the hiring manager or contact person.  This may require time online to identify the person to whom you address the letter. An effective cover letter serves dual purposes: enticing the reader to learn more about you and listing your qualifications. By leading with a specific name you personalize the cover letter and show that you have done your homework.

Update the cover letter.

Review current business letter formats, for both written and electronic communication. Following the styles from your first typing or computer class will identify you as outdated. Email should also be formal and include traditional greetings and a signature with all your contact information. For example:

Name
Email Address
Phone
Cell Phone
LinkedIn Profile
(can be an asset if you have set one up)

Also be certain to include an appropriate Subject Line, such as:

Sales Management Position
Human Resource Manager Application
Financial Analyst Position – Your Name

If you are uncertain about the appearance of your email, send a test version to a friend, family member, or separate account of your own. If you choose to send a test email to another email account of yours, be certain not to send to an existing work-related account. Most company email is considered open to viewing by upper management. Using company resources for a job search is not good form.

Emphasize diverse experience.

A practical outcome of experience is the accumulation of many transferable skills. Related skills and experiences that distinguish you from other candidates can be included in the cover letter and in the summary section of your resume. Connect the dots for the reader by showing exactly which skills will benefit the potential employer, rather than just stating you have “transferable skills”. You can also highlight your ability to be flexible and adaptable – a team player – as you describe these additional skill areas.

Avoid early salary discussions.

Experienced workers have a reputation for being more “expensive”, so it is important to be cautious in any requests for salary expectations. If required, you may respond by stating your flexibility or describing salary expectations as within normal market range.

Mobilize your network.

With broad experience, you have probably built a solid network of contacts. Now is the time to reach out to those contacts to explore knowledge about openings and let people know you are looking. Think about professional organizations, alumnae groups, or local civic groups.

A job search takes time and career transitions rarely happen as quickly as you would like. Hanging in there while opportunities develop may be the hardest part of the search. Using strategies that make you less vulnerable to negative perceptions from hiring managers helps position you to move more quickly through the search process to a new job.

About the Author: Alesia Benedict, Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW) and Job and Career Transition Coach (JCTC) is the President of GetInterviews.com, the country’s leading resume writing firm. They provide professionals with customized, branded resumes and career marketing documents. Her and her firm’s credentials include being cited by JIST Publications as one of the “best resume writers in North America,” quoted as a career expert in The Wall Street Journal, and published in a whopping 25+ career books. Established in 1994, the firm has aided more than 100,000 job seekers to date. All resume writers are certified writers. GetInterviews.com offers a free resume critique and their services come with a wonderful guarantee — interviews in 30 days or they’ll rewrite for free!

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Doostang Success — Responses within 3 Days of Applying for Jobs

Dheeraj

Georgia Institute of Technology, 2009
Supply Chain and Operations Analyst – DTDC

“I was just coming out of college and found job search to be a challenge.  I was applying to jobs on some other sites, but after spending my precious time I was still just waiting for responses and I was beginning to lose my confidence. I did get very few responses eventually, but they still weren’t from the company HRs.

After learning about Doostang, I started applying through the site. I saw some positive responses, so I got a premium membership. All of a sudden, plenty of opportunities opened up all around me.

I started getting responses directly from the hiring managers within 3 days of applying for jobs, which was very quick for me given the time constraint I was in. I ended up getting 2 offers and was in a position to negotiate my pay package.

The filters and saved-searches were very useful. The newsletters sent by Doostang were also consistently guiding me in my job search, and as a result, I was performing better in the interviews.

Overall, Doostang has been a mentor and helped me get many opportunities.

I strongly recommend Doostang Premium to anyone seeking a new job or a career change – I know they will eventually end up with a great opportunity like I did.”


Did you get a job through Doostang? Share your Doostang success story and get a $500 Signing Bonus from Doostang!

Here’s a small sample of the great jobs you’ll find on Doostang:

Summer Intern – Leading Client & Proprietary Assets Firm, Greenwich, CT

Project Director – Prominent Consultancy, Chicago, IL

Quantitative Equity Analyst – Innovative Quantitative Investment Management Firm, Boston, MA

Marketing and Operations Associate – Cutting Edge Tech Startup, SF Bay Area, CA

Investment Banking Analyst – Premier Full Service Investment Bank, New York, NY

Search jobs on Doostang

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Graduate School vs. Full-Time Career

Analyst, Richmond, VA
Marketing Research Associate, Chicago, IL
Investment Banking Analyst, Washington, DC
Consultant, Boston, MA
Associate, New York, NY

More recent jobs you might like…

Many individuals who are finishing up their undergraduate degrees are faced with the dilemma of choosing between pursuing higher education or jumping into the real world and landing a full-time job.  There are certainly pros and cons to each path, but ultimately it comes down to the individual.  If you are facing this conundrum, here are some things you may want to consider:

Graduate School

Pros

Many people in favor of going to graduate school straight out of college argue that this creates a much smoother transition.  You are still in “school mode”, having spent the last 17 or so years of your life in the classroom, and you don’t have as many commitments in the real world that are holding you back.  Because you are fresh out of college, you don’t have a job that will be difficult to leave, and you likely don’t have a family of your own to think about when potentially moving across the country.  In short, you still have the flexibility that makes focusing on graduate school much easier.

People in favor of graduate school after college also argue that in this sort of economy, delaying the job search may be a good idea.  You don’t have to enter the fray quite yet, and in addition to waiting out an iffy job market, you are adding more credibility to your name by earning additional degrees and accolades.

Cons

The downside of entering graduate school is that if the institution you are attending does not sponsor your degree, you are getting yourself into further debt without the guarantee of a job immediately after graduation.  You may also lack the real world experience to determine what exactly you want to pursue, and whether or not your choice of study will be useful in the real world.

Full-Time Career

Pros

One of the biggest pros for waiting a few years before going back to school is that the real world experience you bring with you enriches your academic experience.  You have a better perspective on the practical use of your degree and know more thoroughly what you want to get out of it.  Waiting a few years before returning to your studies may also ensure that you end up pursuing an area that you’re actually interested in, instead of jumping into something right away just for the sake of staying in school.

Another plus to having some real world experience under your belt is that, upon graduation, you are more likely to land a great job. Companies often prefer real world experience in addition to a degree, as opposed to someone who has the same degree but no idea of what it’s like to be in a real working environment.  Also, there is the added benefit of already having the proper connections from your previous job to help get you back on your feet and working again, which you wouldn’t have had if you went straight into grad school.

Cons

The downside to putting off graduate school is that it may be difficult to get back into it.  You may find that you love your job and it’s difficult to leave.  You may have a family, in which case it could be hard to relocate to a place that otherwise would have been an ideal fit for you.  Or you may feel too distanced from academia itself to feel entirely comfortable heading back.

There are certainly drawbacks to each side of the debate, but people pursue both paths successfully all the time.  What it really comes down to is weighing all the pros and cons and deciding what is right for YOU.

All the best,

The Doostang Team

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Show Employers They Need You!

By Alesia Benedict, CPRW, JCTC – GetInterviews.com

Mutual Fund Analyst, New York, NY
Consultant, Washington, DC
Investment Banking Analyst, Boston, MA
Analyst, Multiple Locations
Business Valuation Associate, Nationwide, USA

More recent jobs you might like…

The cover letter is the first opportunity you have to introduce yourself and your extensive skills to potential employers. Make this document work for you by showing employers how you can solve common and unique problems they are facing. Specific strategies in the cover letter will make hiring managers call you!

1. Toot Your Own Horn!

Be sure to include achievements and outstanding accomplishments in the cover letter as well as in the resume.  All hiring managers approach the screening process in vastly different ways.  By including significant achievements in the cover letter you generate interest in your resume and associate certain skills with your name. Listing accomplishments prompts the interviewer to read more and ultimately contact you.

2. Use Key Words Selectively.

Be cautious not to over-use phrases that have become so common they are practically meaningless. You may choose to use such words as “innovated” but be certain to describe exactly what makes your achievement innovative.  For example, “I increased sales 20% by initiating a hands-on mentoring program for new associates”.

3. Managing Challenges.

Employers want loyal personnel who are also able to make things happen. Do you perform well under pressure? Did you identify a procedural problem and devise a solution? Are you uniquely qualified to conduct sensitive negotiations? These are all examples of how you can contribute to the corporation. Describe how you managed these challenges to get the attention of hiring managers.

4. Avoid Explaining Employment Gaps.

You can’t hide an employment gap and if you try to do so, most hiring managers will look on that more negatively than the gap itself. Most explanations of employment gaps are best handled in the resume rather than in the cover letter. If you choose to explain an extended employment gap in the cover letter, the hiring manager may not read further. An exception is in the case of additional training. Improving your skills through formal training or an internship can highlight a change in career direction and emphasize your commitment to the profession.

5. Be Clear About What You Want.

End the cover letter with a request for an interview. Including an intention to follow up can also be effective. For example, “I look forward to meeting with you to discuss the many ways I can benefit your organization”. Being clear about your goals in the job search conveys a sense of authority and competence that helps the hiring manager see how you will perform in the position.

Think of the cover letter as an expanded version of your business card. Limited space forces you to be selective about what you choose to include. Emphasize the ways you can benefit the organization to show employers they need you!

About the Author: Alesia Benedict, Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW) and Job and Career Transition Coach (JCTC) is the President of GetInterviews.com, the country’s leading resume writing firm. They provide professionals with customized, branded resumes and career marketing documents. Her and her firm’s credentials include being cited by JIST Publications as one of the “best resume writers in North America,” quoted as a career expert in The Wall Street Journal, and published in a whopping 25+ career books. Established in 1994, the firm has aided more than 100,000 job seekers to date. All resume writers are certified writers. GetInterviews.com offers a free resume critique and their services come with a wonderful guarantee — interviews in 30 days or they’ll rewrite for free!

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Doostang New Jobs This Week: March 14 – 20


Doostang has thousands of highly sought after positions at companies like Google, Goldman Sachs, Bain Capital, Kohlberg Kravis & Roberts, Summit Partners, Time Warner, Facebook, and more. Looking to get ahead in your job search? Be the first to apply to these exceptional NEW jobs just posted on Doostang.


Investment Research Support Analyst, New York, NY – Investment Research & Advisory Boutique seeks Investment Research Support Analyst.


Associate, Washington, DC – Top Boutique Management Consulting Firm seeks Associate.


Equity Analyst, Boston, MA – Leading Private Banking & Investment Management Company seeks Equity Analyst.


Sr. Analyst – Strategy, Chicago, IL – Innovative E-Commerce Company seeks Sr. Analyst – Strategy.


Business Development Financial Analyst, Los Angeles, CA – Boutique Private Investment Firm seeks a Financial Analyst Intern.


Business Analyst, Washington, DC – Nonprofit-Focused Management Consulting Firm seeks a Business Analyst.


Finance Coordinator, New York, NY – Leading Religious Organization seeks Finance Coordinator.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Savvy Internet Job Search Strategies

By Alesia Benedict, CPRW, JCTC – GetInterviews.com

Private Equity Analyst, New York, NY
Marketing Associate, Chicago, IL
Analyst, San Francisco, CA
Assistant Brand Manager, New York, NY
Investment Banking Analyst, Washington, DC

More recent jobs you might like…

The Internet has become an integral component in almost everyone’s job search. Despite its power to remove boundaries, using the Internet in your job search is not without risk. Savvy strategies will help promote your search and protect personal information, while keeping the job search under wraps from your current employer.

Don’t Get Scammed

With Internet job searches, almost all correspondence between you and a prospective employer may be conducted via email. While that is not extraordinary, you still need to protect yourself if you are unable to find other evidence of the company’s reputation or existence. Even if you have phone contact with a representative of the company, you need to research the firm to ensure their legitimacy. Don’t get pulled into a scam because of your eagerness to obtain employment. Research the company before you get a request for personal information such as your social security number or driver’s license.  Look for specific feedback about the company online to help you determine your next step in interactions.

Keep It Quiet

Most job seekers begin to look for work before they leave their current employment – for basic financial reasons.  However, that doesn’t mean you want your current employer to know.  It is the rare supervisor who is pleased to learn that a key staff member is looking for other work. Never use company resources or time to devote to your job search. Use a personal cell phone or home phone number as a contact. Open a dedicated email account to provide an address other than one associated with your current employer. Even though it may be tempting to make just one copy of your resume at work, don’t risk it. Go to the library or local copy center and spend the few cents for a copy.

Protect Your Privacy

As noted, consider setting up a separate email account solely for use in your job search. When setting up your accounts with major online job sites, be certain to devise user names and passwords that differ from your other accounts. Keep personal, current work and job search accounts separate as much as possible.

Use privacy settings on job search and social media sites. Most major job sites allow your search information to remain confidential. With social media sites, double-check your privacy settings and those who may have access to your postings. You may have included your present employer at one time. Update settings during your job search, so that postings on Facebook about your job search don’t end up at your employer’s inbox.

LinkedIn is Not Facebook

LinkedIn is a professional networking site. Avoid the temptation to include any postings about negative job experiences. This is a site to highlight your strengths. If you feel the need to post on how your current boss unfairly reprimanded you, save it for Facebook and make sure your privacy settings are in place. Better yet, just talk to a friend or family member about it in person. Even with privacy settings, you cannot ensure postings will not migrate beyond Facebook. Such postings may damage your career search when they resurface elsewhere online.

Double-check any employment dates or information posted on LinkedIn against your resume. Any discrepancies in time-lines or information could severely damage your job search.

Identity Theft Protection

Most job seekers are eager to share information with potential employers, but be cautious of providing too much information too soon. Of course, basic contact information is necessary early in the job search process. Once you have determined that you are communicating with a legitimate company, sharing address and phone number via email or your resume are normal parts of the job search. As the negotiations continue, you will be required to provide social security number and complete background checks.  When posting your resume online or sending it electronically, only contact information is necessary to include. Limiting the amount of personal information will help protect you from identity theft.

Take a step back from your job search and objectively review your online presence and job search strategies. Although impossible to maintain complete control of information on the Internet, you can be savvy about privacy settings and how you choose to post your resume. Protecting your privacy is an important component in accelerating your job search.

About the Author: Alesia Benedict, Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW) and Job and Career Transition Coach (JCTC) is the President of GetInterviews.com, the country’s leading resume writing firm. They provide professionals with customized, branded resumes and career marketing documents. Her and her firm’s credentials include being cited by JIST Publications as one of the “best resume writers in North America,” quoted as a career expert in The Wall Street Journal, and published in a whopping 25+ career books. Established in 1994, the firm has aided more than 100,000 job seekers to date. All resume writers are certified writers. GetInterviews.com offers a free resume critique and their services come with a wonderful guarantee — interviews in 30 days or they’ll rewrite for free!

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Doostang News March 14 – How to Make a Good Impression on an Interviewer

Associate, New York, NY
Real Estate Intern, Philadelphia, PA
Quantitative Equity Analyst, Boston, MA
Project Director, Chicago, IL
HY Credit Associate, Los Angeles, CA

More recent jobs you might like…

While you can spend countless hours preparing polished answers, learning how to make great eye contact, and putting together a stellar outfit, one part of the interview that you don’t have total control over is the human element.  For better or for worse, much of what determines whether or not you’ll get the job is how you connected with your interviewer.  If that person doesn’t like you on a personal level, you probably won’t land the position, even if you’re extremely qualified.  That said, here are a few things you can do to make a great first impression:

Use Humor Sparingly

There’s no question that a little bit of humor can ease the tension and make the entire interview seem more comfortable.  But if your interviewer shoots you down with a stern look or a reprimand, your attempt at joking around can turn into a total buzz kill.  The best policy is to stick to something lighthearted that won’t offend someone on any level – after all, you probably know nothing about the person sitting across from you, and therefore you have no way of knowing what types of remarks they would consider to be in bad taste.

Wear Deodorant

This one is common sense. It’s important that you don’t sweat or smell in an interview, otherwise the interviewer will probably rush you out the door in order that they can breathe again.  Make sure to wear something that isn’t too stifling and try not to offer up a wet handshake.  And while it’s crucial to ensure that you don’t smell bad, on the flip side, you don’t want to drench yourself in a perfume that the interviewer will choke on.  Use perfumes and bath products sparingly, since, once again, you don’t know if your interviewer is allergic to – or can’t stand – a certain odor.

Don’t Be Too Demanding

It’s important to inform the interviewer of your job needs during the conversation, and this should come up naturally.  However, don’t get too carried away with making demands about your hours, salary, or office environment.  If you start laying down the law about needing a completely silent work area or a desk next to the window, the interviewer may simply move on to the next candidate who is much easier to handle.

Don’t Be Overly Enthusiastic

It’s important to show excitement for the job in an interview, but if you go through the entire conversation with a giant smile plastered on your face, you’ll come across as too intense, insincere, or downright weird.  You’re interviewing for a job, so try to be serious too.

Don’t Go Overboard with Questions

At some point during the interview, you’ll have the chance to ask a few of your own questions.  It’s crucial to have at least one or two of them ready, and these should be intelligent and relevant.  However, keep in mind that if you start barraging the interviewer with queries – especially if you’re simply asking these to prolong face time  – you’ll probably get on the other person’s nerves.  Asking too many questions can hurt you just as much as not asking any.

Knowing how to behave in an interview is a tricky matter – you want to go in and out with a bang, so that you stand out amidst the other candidates; but you don’t want to go so over-the-top that you offend or annoy.  Probably the best thing to keep in mind is that a job interview is about selling yourself to a company in a professional manner, and that the time to express your individuality and let down your guard will come later.

Good luck,

The Doostang Team

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail