7 Tips for Comparing Job Offers

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During your job search, the idea of landing a job is probably a dream come true.

Whether you’re worried about finding a job that aligns with your career goals or one that simply makes ends meet, landing a job isn’t an easy task. However, if your dream becomes a reality and you receive a job offer (or three!), what do you do next?

While multiple job offers can seem like the best thing to happen during your job search, you now have to make a decision — which offer do you accept? From salary and location, to the job responsibilities and company culture, you’ll have to decide which position is the best fit for you.

Deciding between multiple job offers doesn’t have to be stressful. If you take the time to weigh your options, you can end up making the best decision for your career. Here are some helpful tips to guide you in the direction of accepting the right job for you:

 

1. Consider the location.

When you compare both jobs, take a look at locations and if they’ll have an impact on your daily routine. Will either position require you to relocate to a new city? Are you going to have a new 45-minute commute? Or will you have the opportunity to work from home? Location is essential to choosing the right job. Pay attention to the location of each job and determine if there will be any extra costs involved with accepting the position.

 

2. Ask yourself: Does the position match the lifestyle I want?

The biggest mistake job seekers make when accepting a job offer is not thinking about whether or not the opportunity aligns with their career goals and lifestyle. When accepting a job offer, you must make your needs a priority. If you accept a job that doesn’t fit your lifestyle, how are you going to find the motivation to excel in the workplace?

During your decision making process, make sure you are considering your personal needs such as work-life balance, schedule, and of course, salary. These factors will help you determine which job will satisfy your personal and professional life.

3. Take an inside look at their culture.

Company culture can tell you a lot about a position before you accept it. It’s important to explore the differences between each company so you can have a better understanding of what each job has to offer. Consider questions such as, if you have to work over-time, do you want the flexibility to work on a laptop from your home? Does the employer withhold values that align with yours? By asking these questions about each company’s culture, you’ll be able to determine which job is right for you.

 

4. Look at room for growth.

Whether or not this is a priority for your career, you should look at the opportunities available for promotions and decide if they fit your into your career goals. If job growth is something you desire, make sure you choose the position that gives you the opportunity to move upwards in the company. On the other hand, if you want to find a job where you can have the same position for the next 10 years, you’ll want to consider that, too.

 

5. Opportunities within the workplace.

When you accept a job offer, you want to make sure the position fits your career goals. Accepting a job just isn’t about having a higher salary or great perks, it’s about the learning experience, too. Determine if the company provides you with opportunities for professional development and training in the workplace. If continuous learning is an important element for your career goals, make sure the position you accept meets those needs.

6. Follow your intuition.

The bottom line is only you know what opportunity is the best fit for you and your career. During your job search, you have to trust yourself and your decision making process. Regardless of which job you choose, this decision is for you. If you’re having trouble deciding between job offers, try picturing yourself with each company. This can give you a better idea of which position is the best option for you.

 

7. Take a look at the bigger picture.

After you gather information about the different companies, it’s time to decide which job is the best option. Although salary and benefits might be the biggest factors, you need to pay attention to the smaller details. Regardless of how much an employer can pay you, if you don’t like the company’s culture or it doesn’t fit your lifestyle, then chances are you won’t be happy with the job.

 

You’ll never know when you’ll end up with multiple job offers during your job search. However, if this does happen to you, don’t let it catch you off guard. Be sure to consider all of the details and how they fit into the bigger picture. This is your job search and your career. Choose the path that’s best for your goals and you’ll be on your way to a rewarding career.

 

Have you had multiple job offers before? What helped you during the decision making process?

 

About the Author: Heather R. Huhman is a career expert, experienced hiring manager, and founder & president of Come Recommended, a content marketing and digital PR consultancy for job search and human resources technologies. She is also the instructor of Find Me A Job: How To Score A Job Before Your Friends, author of Lies, Damned Lies & Internships (2011) and #ENTRYLEVELtweet: Taking Your Career from Classroom to Cubicle (2010), and writes career and recruiting advice for numerous outlets.

 

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Tricky Interview Questions

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We’ve covered a lot of tough interview questions in past posts, and here we come at you with yet another round.  Sometimes interviewers ask us questions that are more on the tricky side.  It’s hard to know what to say – it often seems the best approach is to tell them what they want to hear, rather than the truth – and sometimes it’s just confusing why these questions are being asked in the first place.  Here are a few examples:

What Are Your Hobbies?

Why is this question relevant to the job you’re applying for, and why would the interviewer care enough to ask this in a formal interview?  Try to look at this question as a means for the interviewer to understand who you are a little better.  If you’re hired, you’ll be absorbed into the company culture, so the company wants to get a more complete picture of you as an individual.  Understanding what you do for fun can help the interviewer determine what your working style might be like.  It can also help them determine how a job will fit into your life, given what you do outside of your work.

How Would Your Coworkers Describe You?

Do you even know the answer to this question?  Could you really provide an accurate assessment of what others think?  This question is more of a way for the interviewer to find out what qualities you most value about yourself, as you likely assume that these are the same traits that others appreciate.  It also showcases how modest or overconfident you might be.  Here you might take the chance to describe some positive interactions you’ve had with coworkers, citing instances where you have collaborated with them on projects.  This will give you a way to back up your answer, as well as to imply that you are able to work well in a team.

Where Do You See Yourself in Five Years?

This question is tricky because it’s hard to tell if you should speak about yourself in five years at that company – after all, you don’t want to appear presumptuous, but you also don’t want to seem disloyal.  And what if where you want to be is in the seat of the person who is interviewing you?  Instead of focusing on what specific position you see yourself in, try to think of things you want to have achieved.  In what areas will you grow the most?  What goals do you have for your career?  After you’ve considered these questions, you can then turn your answer around and talk about ways in which you will be able to accomplish all of this at the company you are interviewing for, speaking about how your growth will be mutually beneficial for you and the corporation.

Some questions during the interview can seem like time wasters – and some are.  But interviewers often have underlying points they’re trying to get at, even if it’s just to see how you’ll react to a specific question.  Try to prepare for an interview as thoroughly as you can and keep an open mind when tackling tricky questions like these.

All the best,

The Doostang Team

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Doostang News September 27: Questions You Should be Asking in an Interview

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Oftentimes we get caught up in worrying about the questions that a hiring manager is going to ask us during the interview, and overlook the questions that we should be asking them.  It’s important to lob the ball back into their court a bit, because it shows preparedness, interest in the job, and it helps you decide if the company is as good of a fit for you as you are for them.  Here are some questions to consider:

Questions About the Ideal Fit for the Role

You should try to feel out what sort of person they are looking for to fill the role you are applying to.  It’s helpful to ask questions like, “What was the last person who filled this position like?”, “What does the ideal employee look like?”, “What happened to the last person that had this position?”  It’s certainly okay to get a sense for what your predecessor was like, because those are the shoes you’re trying to fill.  The company will expect you to do just as good of a job with the things that the former employee did well; and that person’s weaknesses are areas you can try to improve upon.

Questions About the Work

It’s great to know what kind of work you will be doing and how you will be doing it, to figure out whether or not this will fit with your working style. Additionally, having a better understanding of the specific work you will be doing will give you a better idea of what you need to do to prepare for the job.  Ask, “What big projects are there that might be coming up?”, “Will I be working more independently or with a team of people?”, “What is your company’s management style?”

Questions About the Company

Since you will be a part of a larger whole once you join the company, it’s imperative to know that whole as best as you can, as early on as you can.  Example questions include, “What is the organization structure at the company?”, “What are the long term goals of the company and where do you see it going in 5 years?”, “What is the future of this industry like?”

Questions Related to Your Individual Experience at a Company

If you can, try to get a feel for office culture and the company’s attitude towards its employees.  This is a key determinant in how happy you will be at a corporation, and is important to know as soon as possible.  Some questions to ask are, “Is the office culture more laid-back or traditional?”, “Does the company provide guidance on cultivating career goals?”, “How often and in what manner will my work be evaluated?”

Remember, the interview isn’t just about a company finding out about who you are – it’s just as much about you finding out who they are.  The relationship between you and your employer should always remain mutually beneficial, and that starts in the interview!

Until next time,

The Doostang Team

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