Make New Goals for Your Career Search

By Alesia Benedict, CPRW, JCTC – GetInterviews.com

Finance/Business Coach, Boston, MA
Research & Marketing Intern, New York, NY
Investment Analyst, Philadelphia, PA
Technology Coordinator, San Francisco, CA
Investment Strategies Analyst, Boston, MA

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Your resume is the most important vehicle for sending a positive first impression of you and your skills to hiring managers.  However I hope a strong resume isn’t the only strategy in your tool box for 2011. Many people discount the value of New Year’s Resolutions but recognize the power in writing down intentions. Make a commitment to a successful job search in the coming year by defining your direction. Use the list below or be inspired to come up with your own!

1.  “I will target my job search efforts instead of using the old shotgun approach.”

It’s so easy to send your resume to multiple sites via the Internet, but results are not always optimal. Your resume may become one of hundreds in the hiring manager’s inbox. Target jobs of greatest interest and be diligent about your interactions with those companies as noted in the following intentions for the New Year.

2.  “I will expand my list of contacts by 2 people or organizations each week.”

Add contacts face-to-face, via phone, or electronically. Help new contacts see you as a viable partner in the organization by highlighting how your strengths can further their mission.

3.  “I will improve my resume by emphasizing accomplishments and recent experiences.”

Accomplishments can be communicated to new contacts as well as in revisions of your resume and cover letter.

4.  “I will participate in regional job fairs.”

Job fairs are a great opportunity to reach your weekly contacts goal, make you more visible, and expand your knowledge of the local job market.

5.  “I will make cold calls to regional prospects.”

Calling prospective employers helps you in many ways. You become more than a name in the endless string of resumes. The relationships you develop may leverage an interview and eventually a position.

6.  “I will develop action plans and present to major companies in my job search.”

The action plan is a great strategy and clearly sets you apart from other candidates. Taking time to research the corporation and create a plan that addresses company needs or goals communicates your initiative and unique talents.

7.  “I will use business intelligence and corporate research to revise my cover letter.”

Do research on companies to identify values, projects, and initiatives. Incorporate information into the cover letter by telling prospective employers how your experience and talents solve their problems.

8.  “I will become more active in my professional and community organizations.”

Being active in organizations not only enhances your networking, but may also help you develop additional skills. Serving as member of a Board clearly conveys your leadership skills.

9.  “I will demonstrate my qualities as a solid candidate in every action with potential employers.”

Interactions at every level of the organization reflect on you in the application process. Each phone call, social network posting, and face-to-face contact will be reported up the chain of command. Be deliberate and considerate to be successful.

10.  “I will present a consistent brand in my resume, cover letter, and professional contacts.”

You may have heard President Obama’s brother-in-law describe the importance of behavior on a basketball court in assessing an individual’s overall character. Although not under constant scrutiny when applying for positions, you must be aware that behavioral inconsistencies will be magnified or misinterpreted. Display your best character.

11.  “I will develop an “elevator speech” to use with my expanding professional network.”

Encapsulate key aspects of your skills and professional brand into a 30­-second speech. Use it at every opportunity.

12.  “I will use old-fashioned thank-you notes to follow up all types of contacts and keep my name fresh in people’s minds.”

You may be tempted to send an email note to follow up on a professional meeting. The sheer number of emails most people receive is overwhelming. Sending a hand-written note is another way to distinguish oneself from the crowd.

13.  “I will use social networking sites to my advantage, including adding professional resources, such as resume and career advice consultants.”

Smart use of social media can accelerate progress in your job search. You expand your network and are more likely to be seen by potential employers. Clean up any questionable postings and present yourself professionally to make the best use of social media resources.

14.  “I will continue my professional development activities to improve my skills, expand my network, and maintain my enthusiasm.”

Participating in professional development activities becomes even more critical during employment gaps. You gain focus, new ideas, and strategic contacts.

Most importantly, don’t become discouraged.  A job search can be daunting, but with a specific plan, you can re-gain a sense of control and direction. Well-defined intentions can provide a framework for a successful job search. Be confident as you move into the New Year. Armed with effective goals, you can make this your year to secure a new job!

About the Author: Alesia Benedict, Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW) and Job and Career Transition Coach (JCTC) is the President of GetInterviews.com, the country’s leading resume writing firm. They provide professionals with customized, branded resumes and career marketing documents. Her and her firm’s credentials include being cited by JIST Publications as one of the “best resume writers in North America,” quoted as a career expert in The Wall Street Journal, and published in a whopping 25+ career books. Established in 1994, the firm has aided more than 100,000 job seekers to date. All resume writers are certified writers. GetInterviews.com offers a free resume critique and their services come with a wonderful guarantee — interviews in 30 days or they’ll rewrite for free!

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Doostang News January 17: 3 Networking Opportunities You May be Forgetting

Analyst, New York, NY
Consultant, Chicago, IL
Analyst, San Francisco, CA
Paralegal, New York, NY
Buyside Equity Research Analyst, Dallas, TX

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When asked about their networking strategies, many people will talk about attending happy hours or industry-specific mixers in order to make contacts.  Or they’ll mention that they’ve reached out to family, friends, and old classmates to help them track down job leads.  But there are a few important networking opportunities that job seekers often miss, either because they feel these might be too awkward to use, or because they simply don’t think of these in the first place.  Here are 3 opportunities for networking that every job seeker should consider:

The Company Website

Nothing like going straight to the source.  As many well know, the best way to secure a job is to know someone on the inside.  You may have sent out hundreds of resumes in response to online postings, but heard nothing.  Indeed, this isn’t all that unusual, as many of these positions have already been filled, or the hiring manager might have received thousands of responses.  Instead, try tracking down a few names and email addresses on the company website, and establish a rapport with someone.  Try to ask a specific question about the job you’re interested in, and ask that person to refer you to the individual in charge of hiring for that position – that is, the person who will be making the decision regarding the job, not the HR department.  If there isn’t a position to be filled at the moment, at least you’ll be among the first to know when one opens up.

Professional Networking Sites

Don’t be afraid to hit up your LinkedIn network.  Conduct a search based on companies you are interested in, and reach out to people who come up.  People place their profiles on these websites to network, so don’t hesitate to do just that.  Browse through your connections’ contacts as well, and see if there is anyone you can talk to.  The worst someone can do is ignore you or tell you they’re not interested in speaking, in which case you’ve lost nothing.  Follow the advice from above, and start engaging people from your extended network in conversations.

The Guy on the Street

You never know whom you might meet when you start a conversation with a friendly stranger – and you never know whom they might know.  Disregard what your mother told you and talk to everyone!  The guy serving you coffee, the lady cutting your hair, people in line at the post office – the individuals around you every day, especially the ones in the service industry who interact with a lot of people already, know others who just might help you land your next job.  Don’t be a pest, but don’t hesitate to bring up your job search if the moment is right.

It’s important to continually remind yourself of the importance of networking when trying to secure your next job.  Bear in mind, too, that when you start networking in new and creative ways, you’re bound to see some great results!

Until next time,

The Doostang Team

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6 Internet Traps that Stall a Job Search

By Alesia Benedict, CPRW, JCTC – GetInterviews.com

High Yield Analyst, New York, NY
Business Development Analyst, Toronto, Canada
Associate Principal, Los Angeles, CA
Business Analyst , London, UK
Analyst, Chicago, IL

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Using the Internet is clearly the “go-to” approach used by most job-seekers today, but be certain you don’t treat your online search efforts casually.  Any mistakes could be broadcast to a wider audience than you imagine. Not all publicity is good publicity when it comes to your personal branding enterprise or online job search. Anything posted online tends to take on a life of its own, including job postings. So be certain you maintain as much control as possible of your own information and job search avoiding these 6 traps.

1.  Posting personal contact information.

You need a balance here between being able to be contacted and making yourself vulnerable to identity theft.  When posting your resume, follow each site’s posting guidelines, and be aware of how “public” your contact information will be when your resume “goes live”. Check the settings to see if employers have a secure portal for the site, or if your resume is available to anyone on the Internet.  The more secure the better in targeting your job search and maintaining your privacy.

2.  Using inappropriate email addresses.

Make sure you have selected an email account that is appropriate to your job search. One that is too personal definitely sends the wrong message, suggesting that your boundaries between work and play are not in place.  Similar concerns may be raised about your judgment if you use your current work email.  There are many options to open free email accounts online.  Consider one of those resources to set up a dedicated email account just for your job search.  It may also help you organize your job search efforts.

3.  Opening your job search up to your current employer.

There are many ways your current employer may learn about your job search, but you can take a few precautions to lessen that possibility.  Avoid using any contact information from your current place of employment. Be selective about where you choose to post. Wallpapering the Internet with your resume is likely to create more problems than positive results for you. Do not use work stations or equipment at the office to launch your online job search.

4. Failing to match your qualifications to those required in the position.

It is tempting to send out resumes to interesting positions, particularly if you are ready to explore a new area or feel stuck in your current industry.  Using the “old shot-gun” approach of sending the resume to multiple sites is relatively easy and inexpensive, but such an indiscriminate approach may diffuse your efforts and paint you as desperate or lacking focus. Don’t diminish your strengths by responding to “everything”!

5.  Limiting your job search to online efforts.

Not all jobs are posted online.  Depending on your geographic parameters, you may want to get out and search local job sources as well.  Networking continues to be a strong source of jobs for diligent and well-connected candidates. Don’t rely just on Internet contacts – give your phone number and physical address when you personalize these responses.  Remember, don’t use company time or equipment in sending things out or identifying contact information.

6. Not researching companies to which you are applying

By finding out about the corporate culture for positions of interest, you are more likely to be successful in aligning your job search efforts and resume with those of the company.  And of course, use the Internet to find out basic contact information to take control in reaching the right person.


The Internet is definitely a strong resource in any job search these days. Take a bit of time to check your “appearance” by using an appropriate email account, make sure any attachments are virus-free, and maintain a business-like approach in your email correspondence.  Ensure the first impression of you the potential employer will be viewing, printing, and circulating around the office is the one you want. Using these strategies will help you maintain your online job search momentum!


About the Author: Alesia Benedict, Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW) and Job and Career Transition Coach (JCTC) is the President of GetInterviews.com, the country’s leading resume writing firm. They provide professionals with customized, branded resumes and career marketing documents. Her and her firm’s credentials include being cited by JIST Publications as one of the “best resume writers in North America,” quoted as a career expert in The Wall Street Journal, and published in a whopping 25+ career books. Established in 1994, the firm has aided more than 100,000 job seekers to date. All resume writers are certified writers. GetInterviews.com offers a free resume critique and their services come with a wonderful guarantee — interviews in 30 days or they’ll rewrite for free!

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Doostang News December 13: How to Make Nice (and Not Naughty) at the Office Holiday Party

Investment Banking Analyst, New York, NY
Online Media Associate, SF Bay Area, CA
Associate Editor, Nationwide, US
Management Trainee, Miami, FL
Hedge Fund Investment Analyst, Los Angeles, CA

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It’s that time of year again.  Holiday cheer abounds, from the store discounts that start in October to… the infamous office holiday bash!  The office holiday party holds a warm spot in many a dutiful careerist’s heart – those who recall episodes of reckless inebriation, Yuletide meltdowns, or scandalous rounds of Spin the Dreidel.  Let’s face it: the combination of alcohol, holiday stress, and surly coworkers is a recipe for disaster.  That’s why you need to prepare yourself, and make sure you know how to behave beforehand!  Let’s discuss some ground rules:

Make Sure You Go

Thought you could avoid the pandemonium altogether?  Think again!  Skipping out on the office soiree is often perceived as a sign of disrespect.  Even though the invitation doesn’t always say it, assume that company gatherings usually fall under the “must attend” category – so blowing them off isn’t really an option.  Employers often spend big bucks putting these shindigs together.  Why?  To thrust you into precarious situations that could jeopardize your career?  Maybe some do.  But most like to celebrate in order to show their gratitude for all the work everyone has put in, and also to facilitate company bonding.  Take home point: don’t even think about home until you’ve put in at least a good 30 minutes of face time.

Putting the Office in Office Party

Remember:  even though an office holiday party is meant to be a social event, the professional context remains.  This means that your superiors are watching, ever mindful of who is behaving naughty and nice, and who’s going to get the nix, come Monday morning.  Limit yourself to a two-drink maximum if alcoholic beverages are available; or, better yet, don’t drink at all.  Pay attention to the part of the invitation that explains the dress code – formal or casual – and then dress more conservatively than you would normally; office holiday parties are no place for flagrant self-expression.  Finally, behave yourself.  No lewd behavior or forbidden office liaisons – there’s no sense in embarrassing yourself, or, worse yet, getting slapped with a sexual harassment complaint by HR.

Cocktail Conversation

We’ve already established that office conventions carry over into the after-hours office party, but that doesn’t mean that your cubicle chitchat has to also.  It’s okay to talk some business, but this is a social event.  Lighten up and broaden the conversation.  Otherwise, people will avoid talking to you and you’ll get pegged as uptight or boring.  Another mistake is to relax too much, and start complaining about your job, gossiping about coworkers, or discussing your pay.  Avoid any controversial subjects, especially those related to work.  Finally, branch out and talk to some people you don’t usually get to interact with during normal working hours.  Don’t forget that office parties can be a great chance to network, so don’t be afraid to engage with some of your superiors.

Holiday parties at the office can actually be a lot of fun, and bring out a more relaxed, fun side of the people you work with each day.  Just make sure to keep the obstreperous, party animal side of you in check!

Much love,

The Doostang Team

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Fire Up your Job Search by Broadcasting Strengths!

By Alesia Benedict, CPRW, JCTC – GetInterviews.com

Operations Analyst, New York, NY
Sales and Trading Associate, SF Bay Area, CA
Financial Analyst, Los Angeles, CA
IT Manager, Boston, MA
Analyst – Private Equity Firm, Philadelphia, PA

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Think in Terms of Strengths

Being unemployed, under-employed, or under-appreciated in your current job can erode confidence.  In order to “fire up” your job search, you may need to re-assess the strengths you are emphasizing.  Follow these simple strategies to shift to a position of strengths.

1)    Brainstorm about what you love to do.  This first list should be exhaustive, including strengths from work and personal areas of your life.

2)    List specific skills developed throughout your work history.

3)    What results did you achieve from strengths listed in the first 2 steps? Review positive comments, good performance evaluations, or actual awards to jog your memory.

4)    Think of job requirements for positions in which you are currently interested, and combine the top 2 or 3 items from each of the areas above that you want to emphasize. Use this information to create an “elevator” speech for yourself – a brief, 30-second to 1-minute summary to describe your assets, not a laundry list, but a mini-story. Consider the director pitching his new movie project to a potential producer, or the inventor describing her idea to a potential investor. This becomes your “pitch” – a brief overview of strengths that set you apart from the crowd by outlining what you can do for the potential employer.

Write it Down

Why write it down?  It helps you own the statement.  Not only does seeing the statement in writing help you feel more confident, but it also helps you begin to believe it more strongly yourself.  However, if you notice what you have written down actually rings false or makes you question strengths you have identified, then something about what you have written “doesn’t fit”.  Stretching yourself to fit a particular job opening can be positive, but stretching the truth is never wise. If you can’t believe it yourself, the hiring manager will struggle, too.  Compare your “pitch” with what you created for the first 3 steps above.  Pay attention to how you feel in reviewing the lists and you will be able to fine-tune your pitch into an authentic statement of your strengths.

Practice

Making a brief statement of your strengths isn’t easy.  Practicing the statement will make you feel more comfortable and help you prepare to use it whenever the opportunity arises.

1)    Use the old “in front of the mirror” technique to help you own your new view of yourself, just like you did in speech class or for that first presentation at the office.

2)    Ask family and friends to serve as an audience – request honest feedback about your delivery – how believable are you?  If you don’t believe what you’re saying, it will show. They may notice it even if you didn’t.

3)    Use your network to practice.  Perhaps a small group of job seekers – whom you trust – can try out elevator pitches on each other and incorporate comments to improve the approach.

Networking Contact Follow-up

Remember to follow up after any type of networking contact, whether casual or formal. Incorporate your “pitch” into the follow-up correspondence.  You can send a “thank-you”, “nice-to-see-you”, or “I believe we have a mutual acquaintance” note – all of which can include a comment about your strengths.

Examples of situations where you might send a follow-up note include:

1)    Casual contact (“nice to see you”)

2)    Initial Meeting (“nice to meet you”)

3)    Job Fair Follow-up (“I enjoyed learning about your company and how closely my experience aligns with your needs.”)

4)    Introduction from a friend (“I believe we have a mutual acquaintance, Bob Smith, who suggested I contact you as my strengths could benefit your organization.”)

5)    Thank you (for any suggestion of an opportunity). Even though thank you letters may seem old-fashioned, they can be effective for that very reason – they set you apart from the crowd!

You can be sure the competition isn’t shy about broadcasting strengths and achievements, and their boldness could walk them right into your dream job! You have golden embers smoldering in your work history that, if stoked, will “fire up” your job search. Write down those strengths, practice your “pitch”, then confidently broadcast it!


About the Author: Alesia Benedict, Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW) and Job and Career Transition Coach (JCTC) is the President of GetInterviews.com, the country’s leading resume writing firm. They provide professionals with customized, branded resumes and career marketing documents. Her and her firm’s credentials include being cited by JIST Publications as one of the “best resume writers in North America,” quoted as a career expert in The Wall Street Journal, and published in a whopping 25+ career books. Established in 1994, the firm has aided more than 100,000 job seekers to date. All resume writers are certified writers. GetInterviews.com offers a free resume critique and their services come with a wonderful guarantee — interviews in 30 days or they’ll rewrite for free!

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Doostang News November 15: How Social Networking Sites Can Help You Land Your Next Job

Trading Analyst, New York, NY
Consultant, Mexico City, Mexico
Analyst, Los Angeles, CA
Director/Manager Corporate Strategy, Charlotte, NC
Hedge Fund Business Development & Marketing Assistant, New York, NY

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You’re likely aware of the necessary precautions to take when posting certain information to your Facebook or Twitter profile.  After all, a scandalous picture or status update can doom your chances of bagging a respectable job, especially as more and more hiring managers take to social networking sites to screen prospective employees.  Even though these platforms started out as tools for the youth to connect and share information, they’re slowly starting to lose their youthful flavor.  In fact, social networking is one of the most effective ways to find and land a job these days, and here’s why:

Connect with Relevant People

The open nature of online networking gives you access to a multitude of people you wouldn’t have had the ability to contact otherwise – people who may just hold the keys to your future.  After a little bit of research to determine who the hiring managers and other key figures are, you can then track these people down on websites like LinkedIn, Twitter, or Facebook.  It’s not unusual to reach out to people you don’t know on a social networking site, especially if you introduce yourself in an appropriate manner.  If you don’t have a friend in common that can make the introduction for you, start off with an initial dialogue that explains who you are and what you’re looking for.  It’s best if you can offer something that the other person might need, like an article relevant to their interests or an introduction to someone they might like to get to know – after all, social networking sites are all about sharing information and connecting with people, so they’re liable to appreciate the gesture.  Establish a good rapport with your contact first, and then go ahead and ask about available positions; if there aren’t any, stay tuned, because hiring managers often turn to their networks with opportunities before posting them on job boards.  Moreover, a human connection will be more likely to ensure that your application is actually seen by someone, instead of disappearing into the digital vortex that is online resume submission.

Build Your Personal Brand

No matter what a search result yields when you enter your name, it’s nice to have control over this content.  So another way to use social media to your advantage is to become an avid producer of content that is helpful to others.  Doing so conveys that you are current, involved, and in the know.  You may find that others approach you with opportunities once you gather a following on a blog or various social networking sites; alternatively, you can use this content to supplement your job applications.  You can also use this material as a conversation starter, reaching out to others with articles you have written that they might find interesting.

Be an Active Community Member

Take advantage of the enormous Twitter community and start reaching out to people and having conversations.  Twitter allows you to communicate and share information with everyone from your neighbor to Lady Gaga, so sign up today and start conversing with key players in your target industry.  Once you become embedded in the community, you can also reach out to followers who now know and trust you, and seek out opportunities.

Get “Linked In”

Many individuals spend hours crafting the perfect Facebook profile, but stop short when it comes to filling out a page on LinkedIn.  However, it’s important to take the time to upload your resume, gather references if you can, and connect with as many people as possible.  Since the premise of the website is to establish an online professional network, you won’t seem awkward or boring when you reach out to people with career related matters.  Another feature you should take advantage of is LinkedIn groups – join the ones that are relevant to you and become an enthusiastic contributor.  The more involved you are, the more likely you are to stand out and garner opportunities that become available.

Networking is a crucial part of the job search, and online networking makes that process much easier.  Staying up to speed with various social networking sites is sure to make a world of difference in a job search, and is something every job seeker should pursue to some degree.

Stay connected,
The Doostang Team




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Doostang News November 8: How to Handle a Friend Request from a Coworker

Analyst, New York, NY
Digital Advertising Sales Manager, Los Angeles, CA
Director of Finance, Chicago, IL
Sales Trainee, Boston, MA
PE Investment Analyst or Associate, Philadelphia, PA

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Scroll through your list of friends on your various social media profiles, and if you’re like any other online networking obsessed time waster, you’ll probably notice a myriad of names you don’t even recognize.  How they got there you can’t quite recall, but at some point you’ve given them full access to your profile information.  Yet ironically, those are not the people you’re worried about – it’s oftentimes the people you do know well.  We’re talking about coworkers.  You see these people everyday, you work in the next cubicle over, you eat lunch together during your break.  But when it comes to connecting over the Internet, that’s where you feel you must draw the line.  You like to keep your business life and your personal life as separate, and with good reason.  Goody-two-shoes though you may be back at the office, you’re an all-out hooligan after 5pm, your antics better suited far outside the office.  But how do you bring yourself to turn down a friend request from a coworker and continue leading a double life?  Read on…

Deny Requests from All Coworkers

This doesn’t really seem to answer the present question, but a strict policy that involves denying all office related friend requests diffuses most awkward interactions.  If you make it a point to remain cut off from all of your office peers online, no particular coworker will be personally offended when he or she gets rejected.  If, however, you accept some requests and deny others, you’ll likely have some explaining to do.  Certain cast-out individuals will wonder what’s wrong with them, and worse still, what you’re hiding…

Ignore the Request

You could try to make life easier on yourself by dismissing the request altogether.  Don’t address the issue, and maybe your coworker will forget about the overture they made in the first place.  If they happen to bring it up, simply explain that you don’t spend much time on the website, and thus you haven’t gotten around to connecting with them yet.  You can further spin your web of untruths as you explain that you likely won’t be logging on in the near future, and so they can expect your continued absence from their friend network.  If you do take this approach, just make sure that you avoid making all sorts of public changes to your profile, dispelling the illusion that you have limited your online activity.

Create a Different or Limited Profile

An alternative to denying a coworker’s friend request altogether is to create a different, or in some cases, a limited, profile that your office friends can see.  This is less likely to cause any hard feelings, and the coworker will often be none the wiser.  Yet here too, consider creating a general policy for all coworkers.  You don’t want to get caught up in an awkward situation where a good buddy at work brings up the table dancing pictures you just posted, but hid from others in the office.  (Though is said buddy really a buddy if he sheds light on your rowdy weekend first thing Monday morning?)

As we all know, the advent of social media has brought with it some tricky dynamics in both the job search and the workplace.  Always make sure to put your best foot forward online, and do what you can to protect your privacy.

The Doostang Team would like to add you as a friend!




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Doostang News October 25: What’s Your Name Again? What to do When You Forget Someone’s Name

Private Equity Associate, Boston, MA
Sales Assistant, San Francisco, CA
Jr. Analyst, New York, NY
Analyst, Seattle, WA
Investment Banking Associate, San Francisco, CA

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It’s happened again: you’ve forgotten someone’s name.  This situation is so common that you would think we would all know how to handle it by now, but it never seems to feel less awkward.  The truth is, it happens to everyone, and people will be more forgiving than you think.  But here are a few tactful ways to deal with the situation and make you feel less uncomfortable the next time you draw a mental blank.

Introduce Yourself First

If you encounter someone you know you’ve met before, but can’t for the life of you remember what letter his or her name starts with, take the initiative and reintroduce yourself first.  Do this as a courtesy to the other person, who may have also forgotten your name. This is also a nice way to recognize the fact that it’s been awhile since you were first introduced and that you’d like to get reacquainted.

Introduce Someone Else to Them

If you have a friend by your side, try the approach of introducing him or her to the person whose name you have forgotten.  Most likely, they will introduce themselves to your friend, and there you have it!

Ask Them to Spell It

If the situation is appropriate, ask the individual how they spell their name.  You may dig yourself into a deeper hole if it turns out that you’re speaking to a Bob or a Susan; but if this comes up, say something along the lines of, “Right, and last name?” while you laugh it off.

Ask for a Business Card

Not only will asking for a business card solve the name problem, but you’ll also receive their contact information and an open invitation to get in touch – which can lead to further opportunities!

Flat Out Ask

While it’s preferable not to make it obvious that you’ve forgotten someone’s name, a clumsy attempt to conceal this can muddle an awkward situation even further.  So sometimes the best rule to go by is honesty.  People will certainly understand because they have been there before, and they will appreciate your straightforwardness.

Hello Our Name Is:

The Doostang Team

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Doostang News October 4: Tips for Making an Industry Transition

Investment Banking Analyst, New York, NY
Consultant , Irvine, CA
Associate, SF Bay Area, CA
Product Development Analyst, Chicago, IL
Research Associate, Stamford, CT

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With the job market making a fresh recovery, it’s natural that you may be looking to make the switch to a new industry.  But we all know that it’s hard enough transitioning to a new position, so what’s the best way to make the move into an entirely new field?  Check out some of our tips:

Do Your Research

Spend your time researching as much as you can.  Pour over the latest literature of the industry, brushing up on trends, research reports, conference call transcripts, investor information – whatever you can get your hands on.  The more you know, the easier the change will be.  Try to get to know the ins and outs of your field, going beyond what is expected of your desired job; that way, you’ll be better equipped to face challenges that come your way.

Revise Your Resume

Update your resume to reflect the transferable skills from your previous work that will best suit the type of employment you’re looking to gain.  And if a previous position didn’t require any of these talents, then leave it off.  It’s tempting to list all of the substantive work experience from your past to demonstrate that you are a devoted worker, but employers will spend very little time looking at your resume before moving on to the next one.  Highlight what’s relevant, and if you still feel the need to include the less relevant job experience on your resume, make sure to downplay it.

Network

It’s also imperative that you get out there and get to know as many people in the industry as you can.  Use your existing network to get introductions to workers in the industry you are targeting. These new contacts will be the ones to vouch for you and get you jobs.  They’ll also be the ones that you’ll be doing business with if you land a new job, which will give you a huge leg up from day one.

Finding a new job is tricky, and navigating foreign territory is even trickier.  So make sure to prepare as thoroughly as possible so that you when the day finally comes, you’ll be ready to conquer!

Until next time,

The Doostang Team

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Doostang News August 30: The Art of Confidential Networking

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You know how important networking is to a job search. But what happens when you’re searching for a job while you already have one? It becomes considerably more difficult to go out and interact with other people when there’s the risk that it might get back to your boss. So that’s when you’ll have to employ some secret networking tips. Here are a few:

Network All the Time

This is a good rule to follow, even when you aren’t actively looking for another job. In your current work, you should be networking all the time with everyone you come across. Always conduct yourself in a professional manner, but try to build close relationships with others. This will help you in business as well as in job search. When the time comes that you are looking for a job, you’ll know where to go without having to do extra networking outside of your job – and risk exposure. Additionally, if you build close relationships with your work contacts, they’ll be more likely to keep your job search under wraps.

Don’t Use Company Equipment

When you’re both networking and looking for another job, don’t do so on company equipment. It’s easier to track what you’re doing when you use a company email account or a fax machine. You should also avoid using your current work contact information, as your boss may be able to track this as well. Set up a separate email account and give a different phone number for your job search instead. Some people also prefer to use an alias for their email address or display name, as a further means of camouflage when they show up in various inboxes.

Meet in Person

Meeting in person is often a more effective networking technique anyway, and it helps you in covering your tracks. When you network online, you leave a paper trail that anyone could potentially access. When you network in person, you can hand over all your documents – such as your resume and cover letter – to an individual, instead of sending them over electronically. A physical meeting also opens the door much more easily to future contact by phone instead of email.

These are just a few tricks of secret networking, and there are many more. The reality of the matter is, however, that your boss will find out eventually that you are searching for another job or that you have found one. Try to delay this moment until the latter situation, and the transition will hopefully be much smoother.

Until next time,

The Doostang Team

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