Doostang Success — My Dream Job in Venture Capital

Himani

UC Berkeley, 2010
Investment Analyst – Hercules Technology Growth Capital

“I ended up at Doostang after trying multiple job seeking platforms. The experience here was so much more interactive, unlike other places that felt like a black hole – sucking my applications with no response.

In contrast, at Doostang I was impressed by features like status notifications, which showed me when my resume was downloaded and which employer viewed it.

There is a great amount of credibility in Doostang, so I could be sure that my unique skill sets and qualifications would reach the right set of employers.

I’ve been ‘job watching’ for almost 2 years, and I’ve never seen such a relevant aggregation of specific ‘field-positions’ until Doostang.

Their investment management space in finance has the most updated and selective postings. And that’s how I landed my job at Hercules Technology Growth Capital. Doostang has been an ideal platform for me to end up at my dream job in venture capital.

Kudos to the team, and sincere thanks.”


Did you get a job through Doostang? Share your Doostang success story and get a $500 Signing Bonus from Doostang!

Here’s a small sample of the great jobs you’ll find on Doostang:

Finance Intern – Leading Capital Placement Firm, New York, NY

Sr. Marketing Analyst – Leading Ecommerce Retailer, Boston, MA

Start-Up Hedge Fund Operations Associate – Start-Up Hedge Fund, Manhattan, NY

Chief Executive Officer – Rising Nonprofit Educator, Charleston, SC

Entry Level Treasury Analyst – Top-Tier Financial Company, San Diego, CA

Search jobs on Doostang

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Behaviors that Tarnish Your Office Reputation – Part 1

Entry Level Treasury Analyst, San Diego, CA
Administrative Assistant, New York, NY
Research Analyst – Energy, Boston, MA
Consulting Associate, Multiple Locations
Associate, New York, NY

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Maintaining a good reputation at work is a delicate balance.  Because business is business, and there is usually a lot of stress circulating around an office, people are quicker to judge and slower to forgive.  That’s why it’s important to get off to a solid start and do what you can to remain in the good graces of both your superiors and your coworkers.  Here are a few behaviors to avoid:

Asserting Yourself as the New Guy

When you’re the new guy, it can be tempting to want to enter with a bang, but sometimes this can be a huge turnoff.  If you start off trying to revolutionize things too quickly, people might become offended about the fact that you’re trying to change everything around, and put you back in your place.  While you may have the best of intentions, try to hold back just a little bit, adding your two cents when it seems natural or when you are asked – not when you have to fight to get a word in.  When you first get to a company, take some time to learn what they are about and what they are trying to do, and this will likely enable you to contribute in a more valuable way.  After all, you may feel that you have some very enlightened observations to provide, but these may have already been observed previously (possibly more than once), and broaching the same topic all over again will just make everyone feel like you’re beating a dead horse.

Overextending Yourself

Many people feel that they will actually build a greater reputation by being a “Yes Man”.  Indeed, all companies value reliable employees.  But if you get to the point where you are saying “yes” to everything, you may reach a point where the quality of all of your work suffers, or you may find yourself unable to get to certain projects at all.  It’s important to learn what you can and cannot do, and to budget your time wisely.  It’s perfectly fine to explain to your boss that you simply have too much on your plate to take on another project at the moment – he or she will likely respect you for this.

Failing to Check In

Your boss manages a lot of people, and by extension, manages a lot of projects.  He has a lot on his plate, and so you figure you’ll spare him the headache by getting your work done first and then running it by him.  But this can be a huge mistake.  If you’re working on a big project, it’s probably a good idea to update your boss on your progress and allow him to offer feedback.  Managers like to feel that they are a part of the work, and may become aggravated when you try to run off with it on your own.  Additionally, when you fail to check in and end up doing something incorrectly, you’ll create more work for yourself and irritate your boss even more.

As you can see, much of maintaining a good reputation at work relies on learning how to communicate well – and this means being able to talk as well as listen.  So avoid the above pitfalls, and stay tuned for our next installment of behaviors that have the propensity to ruin an individual’s work reputation!

Until next time,

The Doostang Team

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Who Makes a Good Professional Reference?

Analyst, San Diego, CA
Marketing Intern, New York, NY
Analyst, Colorado Springs, CO
Graduate Consultant, London, UK
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Employers place a lot of value on references, because these provide both an insight into how well you work with other people, as well as a subjective perspective on who you are.  While a resume is something that you can spend time tweaking and perfecting on your own, a reference isn’t entirely in your control, and is therefore more honest in some respects.  For this reason, it’s crucial that when you are deciding whom to ask for a reference, you choose someone who will not only sing your praises, but who will also be able to speak intelligently about you and give hiring managers a more complete picture of who you are and how you work.  Here are some individuals you should consider:

Your Current Employer

Few people will have a better understanding of how well you work for someone than your current employer.  Hiring managers like to speak to referrers who have a current, realistic take on the candidate being reviewed, and so they will take a lot of stock in what your current boss has to say.  Before you list this person as a reference, however, make sure that you have discussed with them your plans to find another position – otherwise you could find yourself in some hot water.

A Past Employer

A past employer is also a good person to turn to, especially if you haven’t worked too closely with your current employer.  It’s especially helpful if you had a particularly close relationship with your previous boss, and if they can provide a more valuable insight into who you are.  Depending on how much time has passed, it’s probably a good idea to refresh this person’s memory by summarizing some of the highlights from your working relationship, as well as to update them on some of your current professional endeavors.

Your Professor

Many individuals just entering the working world will turn to professors to vouch for them, and this is just as acceptable as asking an employer to refer you.  A professor will have a solid idea of your work ethic, your ability to collaborate with others, and your overall intelligence.  He or she will likely focus on the transferable skills that you possess, which you can utilize in the workplace.

A Coworker

If you feel that you cannot turn to an employer for a good reference, consider asking someone you work with.  A coworker can speak to how well you work in a team; they can also discuss your ability to take the lead on certain projects or help others with their work.

A Customer

Depending on your line of work, another individual to consider as a potential reference is a satisfied customer with whom you have worked closely.  This person can speak about your professionalism, your ability to get the job done in a timely manner, and your communication skills.  A customer who is willing to go out of their way to provide a good reference speaks volumes about your character and working style.

These are just a few of the many individuals whom you can ask for a reference.  Other examples include business contacts, teammates, family friends, and more.  Any person who is able to speak about your work ethic, leadership skills,  ability to learn, value as a team member, and so on, is a possible reference.  Just make sure that you ask them before you start giving away their contact information to hiring managers!

Until next time,

The Doostang Team

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Doostang News February 14: The Office Romance Manual – Navigating Love with a Coworker

Analyst, New York, NY
VP of Business Development, Boston, MA
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Around Valentine’s Day it can be difficult to escape all the love hanging in the air – even at the office.  It’s one thing to stress over the unwanted advances of a lusty coworker, and quite another to worry about how you can make an office romance work when you want it to.  Many companies discourage inter-office romance, but when you’re single and surrounded by like-minded individuals for the good part of your day, it’s difficult not to fall for a few office charmers.  So what is the best way to navigate the often complicated office romance?

Be Aware of Company Policy

While dating someone at the office is not illegal, companies have different policies regarding it.  So if you work for an organization that discourages cross-cubicle romance, try to stay below the radar.  If your boss doesn’t care about who you’re bringing home to Mama, you can breathe a little easier, but remain professional regardless.  This means no footsy, kids!

Keep it Out of the Office

To continue, it’s imperative that you keep your relationship out of the office.  It’s unprofessional to be calling out pet names across the conference room table, and it’s even worse to bring your personal disagreements into work.  It also puts those around you in an awkward position, and sets you up for accusations of favoritism.

Consider the Breakup

Before you embark on an intense amorous affair with a fellow employee, consider what the outcome might be if you break up.  Is this person a boss who might hamper your professional growth if you make them sleep out on the couch?  Is this an individual that works under you who might charge you with harassment or favoritism of other workers when you fail to return a box of their favorite DVDs?  Think long and hard about this, and make sure that if you do go through a nasty break up, the two of you can act like adults, at least from 9 to 5.

Watch Your Online Activity

It bears repeating that you can never be too careful when it comes to representing yourself online.  So if you’re trying to keep an office relationship under wraps, be mindful when you set a relationship status on Facebook, post pictures, or write comments.  It’s also wise to make sure you keep everything tasteful in general.  Another important thing to consider is the emails you send throughout the day.  If you are using your work email account to send a message, others in the company may be able to access it.  Be careful what you send to a significant other, avoid sending personal messages through office accounts, and again, keep it tasteful.

Office romance is on the rise, and with good reason.  Who doesn’t like an intelligent, sexy working man or woman?  That’s what we thought.  Just take a few extra precautions, stay professional, and have fun!

xoxo,

The Doostang Team

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Doostang New Jobs This Week: Jan 3 – 9


Doostang has thousands of highly sought after positions at companies like Google, Goldman Sachs, Bain Capital, Kohlberg Kravis & Roberts, Summit Partners, Time Warner, Facebook, and more. Looking to get ahead in your job search? Be the first to apply to these exceptional NEW jobs just posted on Doostang.



Investment Banking Analyst, Boston, MA – Boutique Investment Bank seeks an Analyst.


Jr. Associate, Chicago, IL – Analytics & Market Insight Group seeks a Jr. Associate Consultant.


Investment Banking Analyst, New York, NY – Boutique Investment Banking Firm seeks an Investment Banking Analyst.


Software Engineer, SF Bay Area, CA – Leading Online Coupon Company seeks a Software Engineer.


Sr. Strategic Planning Analyst, Atlanta, GA – Global Media & Broadcasting Company seeks a Sr. Strategic Planning Analyst.


Marketing Director, Brooklyn, NY – New & Innovative Social Music Platform seeks Marketing Director.


Investment Banking Analyst, San Diego, CA – Prominent Investment Banking Group seeks an Analyst.

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