Your List of Entry-Level Accounting and Finance Jobs for 2014: Part 1 of 3

Your List of Entry-Level Accounting and Finance Jobs for 2014

Another round of accounting and finance majors are set to secure their undergraduate diplomas in the coming weeks. Next up? Recent grads will either head to graduate school or start looking for a job. If you’re a soon-to-be graduate, in search of entry-level accounting and finance jobs, what type of position appeals to you?

The competition is stiff for new graduates, so having options doesn’t hurt. You may not get your dream job straight out of the gate, but getting experience to further your finance career will help you advance to top accounting and finance jobs down the road.

We’ve compiled a list of jobs for you to peruse, along with median income expectations from the Bureau of Labor and Statistics’ (BLS) most recent research.

In the first part of this three-part series, we will review jobs in accounting and those in the insurance sector. Parts two and three will cover jobs in finance, banking and other positions available in the private and public sectors.

Entry-Level Accounting Jobs

Graduates with 4-year accounting degrees are in demand and have a better chance of finding work than many other recent grads according to research from the University of California, San Diego. If you’re looking at options for entry-level accounting jobs, you might consider the following positions.

Accounts payable, accounts receivable clerk. These positions require little to no experience and many positions only require a high school diploma. If you’re looking for a position to help pay the bills until a better paying gig comes along or for a way to get your foot in the door at a prestigious company, consider an AP/AR job. Median Income: $34,030.

Accountant. A wide variety of accountant positions exist in private and public corporations as well as at government agencies. Possible job titles include accounting generalist, cost accountant, tax accountant, accounting manager, corporate controller, corporate accountant, certified public accountant (CPA) and more. Read this recent post for a detailed breakdown of entry-level accounting career options. Median Income: $61,690.

Auditor. The Wall Street meltdown was followed by a series of new regulatory and compliance requirements via the Sarbanes-Oxley and Dodd-Frank Acts, meaning the government is keeping closer watch on how businesses handle money. This has lead to a rise in the number of auditor positions available across all industries and sectors. If reviewing financial statements and minding city, state and federal legislation intrigues you, consider a role as an auditor. Median Income: $61,690.

Entry-Level Insurance Jobs

Insurance is another industry sector that employs accounting and finance professionals. Job security is typically one of the perks for hard-working pros in the insurance industry. Along with a variety of financial analyst opportunities, consider these entry-level jobs if you’re interested in working in insurance.

Underwriter. Simply put, the insurance underwriter reviews actuarial findings to determine whether the insurance company should issue an insurance policy to an individual or organization. They also recommend insurance premiums based on the level of risk calculated for the proposed insured. Median Income: $59,290.

Actuary or actuarial analyst. Actuaries may work in other industry sectors, but are most often associated with insurance. If you enjoy making sense of large volumes of data and forecasting risk (of death, injury, illness, property loss, etc.) based on your research, a career as an actuary might be a good fit for you. Median Income: $87,650.

Part two of this series will cover entry-level finance and accounting jobs in finance and banking. We will close out the series in part 3, looking at others accounting and finance positions in the private and public sectors.

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Photo Source: Shutterstock

Resources:

“Occupational Outlook Handbook.” United States Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. Available at http://www.bls.gov/ooh/. Accessed Nov. 29, 2013.

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